I was standing across the road from the building.

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tufguy

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1) I was standing across the road from the building.

2) We were standing on the opposite road as the building.

3) He was on the opposite road as we were.

4) He was in his car across the road from the building.

Could you please check my sentences?
 

Rover_KE

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1) I was standing across the road from the building.:tick:

2) We were standing on the opposite road as the building.:cross:

3) He was on the opposite road as we were.:cross:

4) He was in his car across the road from the building.:tick:
`
 

emsr2d2

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1) I was standing across the road from the building. :tick:

2) We were standing on the opposite road as the building. :cross: I can't even work out what you're trying to say.

3) He was on the opposite road as we were. :cross: He was on the opposite side of the road from us.

4) He was in his car across the road from the building. :tick:

Could you please check my sentences?

See above. "Opposite road" doesn't make sense.
 

Skrej

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I probably shouldn't encourage this, but I suppose I could see one solitary context where 'opposite road' might work. If there were two roads running parallel, (like say a frontage road running alongside a highway), then I suppose you could use that sentence.

I still don't think I would use it, but I suppose I could.
 

emsr2d2

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I agree that it's possible but I'll stake my house (if I had one) on the fact that that's not what Tufguy's trying to say.
 

Tdol

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I probably shouldn't encourage this, but I suppose I could see one solitary context where 'opposite road' might work. If there were two roads running parallel, (like say a frontage road running alongside a highway), then I suppose you could use that sentence.

I still don't think I would use it, but I suppose I could.

Road opposite would also work in some contexts, but it couldn't be dropped into #3.
 

tufguy

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I probably shouldn't encourage this, but I suppose I could see one solitary context where 'opposite road' might work. If there were two roads running parallel, (like say a frontage road running alongside a highway), then I suppose you could use that sentence.

I still don't think I would use it, but I suppose I could.

images



http://static.panoramio.com/photos/original/26511031.jpg

This is what I mean. If there are two parallel roads and I am standing by the left road (I do not know what is the way to describe this?) or the coming road and building is on "the side of going road" or "by the going road" then I have to say "I am standing across the road from the building". "I am standing on the opposite road" cannot be used am I correct?

Did I write these sentences correctly? What is the term for "coming and going road" and "building is on the side of going road"? What is frontage road?
 
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emsr2d2

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You are standing on the opposite carriageway (BrE). However, you wouldn't be standing in the traffic! You would be standing on the pavement so you are simply "on the opposite side of the road".
 

Skrej

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worms.jpg

Technically, that's still just one road with divided lanes, so no. I think you're still better off just saying you're standing across the road from the building. It doesn't really matter that you're across eight lanes of divided highway.

If you're trying to cross the road, the traffic direction is relative to whichever way you're looking, so inbound/incoming and outbound/outgoing are fluid terms. If you really had to specify, I'd just say eastbound/westbound (or whichever direction the road runs) traffic.

As for 'frontage road', it may be called other terms in other variants. See here.
 

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View attachment 2628

Technically, that's still just one road with divided lanes, so no. I think you're still better off just saying you're standing across the road from the building. It doesn't really matter that you're across eight lanes of divided highway.

If you're trying to cross the road, the traffic direction is relative to whichever way you're looking, so inbound/incoming and outbound/outgoing are fluid terms. If you really had to specify, I'd just say eastbound/westbound (or whichever direction the road runs) traffic.

As for 'frontage road', it may be called other terms in other variants. See here.

So can we say "I am standing by the 'eastbound road or westbound road or northbound road' or building by the eastbound road"?
 

tufguy

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You are standing on the opposite carriageway (BrE). However, you wouldn't be standing in the traffic! You would be standing on the pavement so you are simply "on the opposite side of the road".

On the opposite side of the road means across the road am I correct?
 

Rover_KE

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"On the opposite side of the road" means "across the road". Am I correct?
Will you please stop making these basic errors.:bad-word:

Yes, it does.
 

Rover_KE

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I'm going to summarily delete them in future.
 

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images



http://static.panoramio.com/photos/original/26511031.jpg

This is what I mean. If there are two parallel roads and I am standing by the left road (I do not know what is the way to describe this?) or the coming road and building is on "the side of going road" or "by the going road" then I have to say "I am standing across the road from the building". "I am standing on the opposite road" cannot be used am I correct?
What is shown in the photo is considered one road.

Usually we use directions to differentiate the sides, such as "westbound" or "eastbound". "There's an accident on the northbound side of Washington Avenue near the Wal-Mart."
 

tufguy

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What is shown in the photo is considered one road.

Usually we use directions to differentiate the sides, such as "westbound" or "eastbound". "There's an accident on the northbound side of Washington Avenue near the Wal-Mart."

By "northbound side" you mean "northbound road". Am I correct?
 

tufguy

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No. Read post #15 again.

Does it mean "northbound side of the road or avenue"? I am confused about it. I was told that we use "eastbound" or "westbound" to specify the direction. Could you please explain it to me?
 
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emsr2d2

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In your picture, there is one road. It has two sides/carriageways - one goes north and the other goes south (or maybe east and west, I can't tell). All the cars are on the road. Some are on one side/carriageway and some are on the other.

In a traffic report, for example, there would be a need to specify which side. You would hear something like this:

"On the M4, there are severe delays on the northbound carriageway due to a serious accident."

(The M4 is a major motorway in England.)
 

tufguy

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In your picture, there is one road. It has two sides/carriageways - one goes north and the other goes south (or maybe east and west, I can't tell). All the cars are on the road. Some are on one side/carriageway and some are on the other.

In a traffic report, for example, there would be a need to specify which side. You would hear something like this:

"On the M4, there are severe delays on the northbound carriageway due to a serious accident."

(The M4 is a major motorway in England.)

If the road doesn't have a name then can I say I am standing (I am on foot) by the northbound carriageway that is right in front of the AX building?
 

emsr2d2

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You are standing by the northbound carriageway opposite the AX building.
 
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