I went swimming because it was a hot day.

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Tan Elaine

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I went swimming because it was a hot day.

Is the sentence correct? Thanks.
 

BobK

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:up:
I went swimming because it was a hot day.

Is the sentence correct? Thanks.
But colloquially you'd be more likely to say 'I went swimming because it was hot'. It's less clear, but still... ;-)

b
 

Tan Elaine

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Thanks, Rover and Bob.

Because it was a hot day, I went for a swim.
Due to a hot day, I went for a swim.

Are both sentences fine? Thanks.
 

emsr2d2

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Thanks, Rover and Bob.

Because it was a hot day, I went for a swim.
Due to a hot day, I went for a swim.

Are both sentences fine? Thanks.

The first is OK although, again, it would be more likely to be "Because it was hot, ..." instead of "Because it was a hot day, ..."
The second is not natural. We might say "Due to the heat, ..."
 

Tdol

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Or you could say It was a hot day/hot, so I went swimming.
 

BobK

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:up: There are people who decry that use of 'Due to', on the grounds that 'due' is a adjective - which needs a noun to qualify. The decision to go for a swim was due to the heat. In that case, I'd (for I am one of these cathars ;-)) say 'Owing to the heat...' or 'Because of the heat...'. But I'm swimming against the tide. Starting a sentence wth a 'dangling' due to is very common, especially on notices about train services being late - 'Due to leaves on the line...', 'Due to extreme weather...', 'Due to an incident at Mornington Crescent...' ;-)

b
 

MikeNewYork

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"Due to the heat", yes. But surely not "due to a hot day".
 
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