"I will give it all to you if you will worship me."

Status
Not open for further replies.

Odessa Dawn

Key Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2012
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Arabic
Home Country
Saudi Arabia
Current Location
Saudi Arabia


Luke 4

[SUP]6[/SUP] "I will give you the glory of these kingdoms and authority over them," the devil said, "because they are mine to give to anyone I please.
[SUP]7[/SUP] I will give it all to you if you will worship me."


Remember!

1. The conditional construction does not normally use will or would in if-clauses. EXCEPTION: If will or would express willingness, as in requests, they can be used in if-clauses. e.g. If you will come this way, the manager will see you now.
I would be grateful if you would give me a little help.
First, Second, and Third Conditional


If I come across such an exception in English exam, will using "Will" in if-clause save me from losing marks?

Thank you.

 

5jj

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
Czech Republic
Current Location
Czech Republic
If I come across such an exception in English exam, will using "Will" in if-clause save me from losing marks?
I am fairly certain that no examiner for reputable examinations (such as those of Cambridge, Trinity or IELTS), is going to worry too much about a well-placed (or a misplaced) 'will'. Most sensible examinations these days test the ability to communicate effectively; they do not deliberately try to catch people out on odd points of grammar. Even those examinations that still explicitly test the candidates' knowledge of usage and grammar try to ensure that, in the questions they set, answers that a reasonably educated native speaker might give will not be penalised.

Unfortunately, I cannot say the same about tests and examinations set by some national examining bodies, universities, schools and text book writers. You'll often find us saying in this forum, "That is a bad question". Learners who have to take such examinations just have to accept what their examining body decrees is 'correct'. You have my sympathy.
 

Odessa Dawn

Key Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2012
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Arabic
Home Country
Saudi Arabia
Current Location
Saudi Arabia


Yes, completely agreed. I ask you such a question since I have not studied English basic structures so far although I joined a well-known school in S. Arabia for many years. Unfortunately, I have been subjected to a lot of English language exams and lacking the basics; therefore, the quality of teaching is below the international standard. I am still at the bottom of the ladder thus I have been studying for many years where people in developed countries can achieve that in a short time. Time and energy can be saved besides, making a difference.

An example:

I was asked the below question:


"You can learn the basic structures of a language quite quickly, but only if you … make an effort.


1.are wanting
2.will to
3.are willing to

I chose \3. Infinitive in the second one gave me a clue/hint that \2 is wrong. To be honest with you, I learned this rule from online not from local schools.

 

BobK

Harmless drudge
Staff member
Joined
Jul 29, 2006
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
I think in the case presented in the OP, the 'will' was in any case used with a sense of 'choose to do something willingly'; but your choice was good - that's the way we express this sort of willingness today.

b
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top