If you have a better suggestion, I would likely to listen to you.

Kamshing

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1) If you have a better suggestion, I would likely to listen to you.

Dear teachers, is this sentence grammatically correct?

Thank you.

Kam Shing.
 

GoesStation

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No. The modal would has to be followed by a bare infinitive.
 

Kamshing

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Dear teachers,

1) If you have a better suggestion,I would likely listen to you.Is this sentence correct?

Thank you.

Kam shing
 

Rover_KE

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[STRIKE]Dear teachers,[/STRIKE] This is unnecessary.

1) If you have a better suggestion, (leave a space after a comma] I would [STRIKE]likely[/STRIKE] like to listen to you. Is this sentence correct? It is now.

Thank you.

[STRIKE]Kam shing[/STRIKE] This is unnecessary.
`
 

tzfujimino

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Are you sure the "likely" is the word you wish to use, Kamshing?
 

emsr2d2

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I find "likely" quite unlikely there too! I'd say "If you have a better idea, I'd like to hear it".
 

GoesStation

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1) If you have a better suggestion,I would likely listen to you.Is this sentence correct?

It's natural in my dialect of American English. (Piscean guessed right in post #5.) We use likely as an adverb. It might sound somewhat colloquial, though.

Put a space after every period ("full stop" in British English) and comma.
 

Barb_D

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And I'd write something like "I welcome any suggestions for improvement."

Or "I will probably listen to any suggestions for improvement" if that really was the intended meaning.
 

Kamshing

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Dear Tzfujimino and other teachers,

I am sure I want to use the word "likely" in my sentence because it implies the meaning I want to convey.

!) I have checked some of the part numbers for the Track Links are wrong. Please adjust them back to the correct part numbers in the inventory stock listing in your computer. This is to avoid query by auditor during the stock check. If you had a better suggestion to solve this problem, I would likely listen to you.

Note: The word "likely" here implies that my colleague has more experience than me to solve this problem.
 

Matthew Wai

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If my colleague is more experienced than I am, I would certainly listen to him/her.
 

Barb_D

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Dear Tzfujimino and other teachers,

I am sure I want to use the word "likely" in my sentence because it implies the meaning I want to convey.

Note: The word "likely" here implies that my colleague has more experience than me to handle this type of problem

No, it doesn't. It means you may or you may not listen to his or her experience, and you probably will.

If you have, ... I will - this is the tense you need for this sentence.

Try: If you have a better way to do this, please let me know.

Note that every sentence needs to start with a capital letter. Your second sentence starts with a lower-case p.
I don't understand your third sentence.
 

Kamshing

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Dear Emsr2d2 and other teachers,

In your sentence "If you have a better idea, I'd like to hear it".

Are these words "I'd" means "I would"? (I would like to hear it).
 

Barb_D

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Perhaps this an American interpretation, but "if you have a better idea, I'd like to hear it" sounds confrontational.

"I'd like to hear it" can be used to express you don't believe there is such a thing.
If you can come up with a single positive thing to say about that creep, I'd like to hear it!
If you have a good reason this lamp is broken, I'd like to hear it!
If you have a better idea, I'd like to hear it! No? I didn't think so.

If you have a better idea, I'd welcome your input.
I'd appreciate hearing any better ideas you may have.
Please let me know if you have a better way to resolve this.
 
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