inherent in/to

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Allen165

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Is it irrelevant whether one uses "in" or "to" after "inherent"?

I think one uses "to" when the word that follows is a noun. For example, "injuries are inherent to sport."

"In" comes before a verb, I think. For example, "discrimination is inherent in selecting national teams."

Thanks.
 

PROESL

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Is it irrelevant whether one uses "in" or "to" after "inherent"?

I think one uses "to" when the word that follows is a noun. For example, "injuries are inherent to sport."

"In" comes before a verb, I think. For example, "discrimination is inherent in selecting national teams."

Thanks.

Those sound like good word combinations for "inherent" to me, yes.
 

bhaisahab

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Is it irrelevant whether one uses "in" or "to" after "inherent"?

I think one uses "to" when the word that follows is a noun. For example, "injuries are inherent to sport."

"In" comes before a verb, I think. For example, "discrimination is inherent in selecting national teams."

Thanks.

Yes, you are right.
 
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