'Lukewarm' Vs 'Tepid'?

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Mehrgan

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Hi,
May I know, please, which one is 'warmer' then the other one?! Is either of them used more positively? Thanks.
 

Gillnetter

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Hi,
May I know, please, which one is 'warmer' then the other one?! Is either of them used more positively? Thanks.
I don't know that there is much difference between these words. Both are usually used in reference to the temperature of water. Also, I can't see how the temperature of water can be understood as being more or less positive. I would say that the coffee is lukewarm and the swimming pool is somewhat tepid - but that is merely a subjective response.
 

Mehrgan

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Thanks for the reply! By 'positive' I meant when it's ok for drinking. I think people wouldn't like to drink their tea if it's turned lukewarm. Is that right?
 

Gillnetter

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Thanks for the reply! By 'positive' I meant when it's ok for drinking. I think people wouldn't like to drink their tea if it's turned lukewarm. Is that right?
I don't believe that there is any consensus on the correct way to speak of drinkable tea. 'lukewarm" is as good as any. I would say that I will drink the tea when it has cooled down a bit.
 

emsr2d2

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As far as temperature goes, I would say they're probably pretty similar. The only difference I can think of is that water cools down from hot to lukewarm, but if it starts cold and only goes up in temperature a small amount, it only reaches tepid. That's not a rule though, that's probably just how I happen to use it.
 

5jj

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If I have to drink tea that is not hot enough, or get into a bath that is less warm than I would like, then lukewarm sounds less uninviting than tepid. Like the others, I am giving a personal response, not an attempt at an objective one.
 

BobK

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:up: I agree with everyone, and disagree. There's no agreement (as Gilnetter said). I'm giving a personal response, as 5jj said. I see the two words the same as Ems - only reversed! For me, 'lukewarm' is nearly cold. If I had lukewarm tea, I'd throw it away and make another cup. Whereas tepid is, for me, not quite boiling (but I have noticed that most usage, and dictionaries, disagree with me - so I try to avoid both words:))

b
 

Tdol

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As far as temperature goes, I would say they're probably pretty similar. The only difference I can think of is that water cools down from hot to lukewarm, but if it starts cold and only goes up in temperature a small amount, it only reaches tepid. That's not a rule though, that's probably just how I happen to use it.

I agree with your idea of warming up- lager might become tepid, but it's unlikely to become lukewarm.
 
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