[Grammar] Mark Twain, where is a verb?

romVsen

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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain,
The first sentense in the preface:
MOST of the adventures recorded in this book really occurred; one or two were experiences of my own, the rest those of boys who were schoolmates of mine.

The question: where is a verb in the part "the rest ..."?

Thank you in advance,
Roman
 

5jj

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The 'were' of one or two were experiences of my own is understood as applying to the following clause.

Welcome to the forum, romVsen.
 

romVsen

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But if Mark Twain would write

MOST of the adventures recorded in this book really occurred; one or two were experiences of my own, the one that of boy who was schoolmate of mine.
Would it be correct?
 

Tdol

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And it changes the meaning- they happened to various schoolmates.
 

romVsen

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Well, let me define my second question in more clear way.

In my example we see compound sentence. The first clause is
one or two were experiences of my own,

the second clause is
the rest those of boys who were schoolmates of mine.

In both clauses objects are plural. So, I understand that we can omit the verb in the second clause.

But if an object in the second clause would be in singular (and an object in the first clause would be still in plural)?
Can we omit the verb in the second clause in this case?

Thank you!
 
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MikeNewYork

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Well, let me define my second question in more clear way.

In my example we see compound sentence. The first clause is


the second clause is


In both clauses objects are plural. So, I understand that we can omit the verb in the second clause.

But if an object in the second clause would be in singular (and an object in the first clause would be still in plural)?
Can we omit the verb in the second clause in this case?

Thank you!

In your revision, there is no way to understand what "the one" refers to. If you change "the" to "and", it will be much better.
 
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