Me too and likewise

Ju

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I googled the differences between the usages of "likewise" and "me too". I got the answers as follows.

"You can only use "me too" when you respond to a statement that does not have the word "not."
For example:
- I like food.
- Me too.

If someone says "I don't like food" and you agree with them (you also don't like food), you cannot say "Me too."
Instead, you must say "Me neither."

However, you can use the word "likewise" to respond to any statement you agree with.

- I like food.
- Likewise.

- I don't like food.
- Likewise."

Do you agree with the above answer?
 

Tarheel

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I don't disagree with those statements.

Ron: I don't like anchovies on my pizza.
Dan: I don't like them on my pizza either.
Ron: What about Hawaiian pizza?
Dan: Pineapple on pizza? I'll have to try that.

John: I don't like getting poked in the eye with a sharp stick.
Mike: Me neither.
 

GoesStation

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"Likewise" was often used that way in my childhood days. I don't think I've heard it in decades. I'd recommend that you stick with me too and me neither.
 

Tarheel

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I wouldn't overwork the "Me too" thing. Especially if you are past your childhood days.

Dad: Who wants to go with me?
Ann: I want to go!
Davy: Me too!
 

GoesStation

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Good point. So do I and Neither do I are better in less casual speech.
 
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