[Vocabulary] Meaning of grub food

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Jgold

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I read in a blog post the term 'grub food'. One of the definition for 'grub' on urban dictionary is as a descriptor for delightfully tasty food, which I believe to apply in this context. Is this correct? If not, what does it mean?

This is the link for the blog post: http://danielfooddiary.com/2016/01/17/chickenwaffles/
 

bhaisahab

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The term "grub food" does not exist in any variety of English that I am familiar with.
 

MikeNewYork

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In AmE English, "grub" is sometimes used as a substitute for "food". Let's get some grub.
 

MikeNewYork

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We don't have "grub food" either.
 

Rover_KE

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Daniel Ang coined the phrase for his blog/diary. You're not likely to find it anywhere else.
 

Tdol

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He's Singaporean, so it may be used in that variant. I have never heard it in British English.
 

Skrej

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In AmE, while 'grub' can be used as a synonym for 'food', it (to me anyway) has connotations of plain or simple food, possibly even sub-par. You can live on grub, but it's not fine dining.

Another similar synonym is 'chow', with even maybe even stronger connotations of inferior quality or mass-production. You stereotypically get grub and chow in college cafeterias, military mess halls, etc. Grub and chow are more about quantity, not quality.

I find it amusing that chicken and waffles are that widely available in Singapore.
 

Jgold

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Thanks y'all ;) Hey don't mock the chicken waffles. Just admit it, they sound good, don't they?
 

Tdol

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In AmE, while 'grub' can be used as a synonym for 'food', it (to me anyway) has connotations of plain or simple food, possibly even sub-par. You can live on grub, but it's not fine dining.

It is the same in BrE.
 

Tdol

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Thanks y'all ;) Hey don't mock the chicken waffles. Just admit it, they sound good, don't they?

They could easily hit the spot. I will look out for them next time I am in Singapore. ;-)
 

SoothingDave

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Thanks y'all ;) Hey don't mock the chicken waffles. Just admit it, they sound good, don't they?

This is another peculiar formation. They are known as "chicken and waffles" where they are served in the US. "Chicken waffles" sounds like a waffle that is flavored like chicken.
 
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