meaning of 'in showroom condition'

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Tan Elaine

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Do native speakers use the term 'in showroom condition"?

If so, does the phrase used by a second-hand car dealer mean that his car for sale is in good condition in all aspects from the paintwork to the engine and all other parts? Or do they mean that the car and its engine and all the other parts look new when the buyer views the car both outside and inside where the internal parts can be seen, and therefore it is fit for display in the showroom?

My friend says that it means that all parts, including the engine parts, are in good condition for the car of that age without the need to have a certificate certifying that the car has been thoroughly inspected and found to be in good condition.

To me, 'in showroom condition' if native speakers do use the term, should mean that the car has to be thoroughly checked by an authorised inspection centre and he should have a certificate to prove that the engine and all other parts are in good condition for the car of that age before he can use the phrase 'in showroom condition'. And if he does not have such a certificate, he is not entitled to say that his car is 'in showroom condition'. I think, for the purchase of making a sale, the car dealer can use the term loosely, but that is tantamount to deceiving the customer.

It would appear that I am wrong because my friend's husband also thinks that the phrase means the car is in good condition for a car of that age, regardless of whether he has a certificate I stated above.

Thanks in advance and I apologise for what may appear a silly question to some native speakers.
 
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bhaisahab

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Do native speakers use the term 'in showroom condition"?

If so, does the phrase used by a second-hand car dealer mean that his car for sale is in good condition in all aspects from the paintwork to the engine and all other parts? Or do they mean that the car and its engine and all the other parts look new when the buyer views the car both outside and inside where the internal parts can be seen, and therefore it is fit for display in the showroom?

My friend says that it means that all parts, including the engine parts, are in good condition for the car of that age without the need to have a certificate certifying that the car has been thoroughly inspected and found to be in good condition.

To me, 'in showroom condition' if native speakers do use the term, should mean that the car has to be thoroughly checked by an authorised inspection centre and he should have a certificate to prove that the engine and all other parts are in good condition for the car of that age before he can use the phrase 'in showroom condition'. And if he does not have such a certificate, he is not entitled to say that his car is 'in showroom condition'. I think, for the purchase of making a sale, the car dealer can use the term loosely, but that is tantamount to deceiving the customer.

It would appear that I am wrong because my friend's husband also thinks that the phrase means the car is in good condition for a car of that age, regardless of whether he has a certificate I stated above.

Thanks in advance and I apologise for what may appear a silly question to some native speakers.

I don't know if there is any law in your jurisdiction which says there must be a certificate to prove the condition of the car can be described as "showroom". I daresay that there are countries where that is the case.
 

Barb_D

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In the US, there would be no way to get such a certificate. There is no such thing as a person "authorized" to say that a car is in any sort of condition, except a minimum inspection level as required by each state to ensure a car is safe to be on the roads.

It would just mean that it is as clean and shiny as when it could have first been bought and was still in the showroom. No dents, dings, scratches, rust, etc.
 
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Tan Elaine

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Hi all members

From Bhaisahab's and Barb_D's replies, can I conclude that a second-hand car 'in showroom' condition' is just a sales gimmick to tell buyers that the car's paintwork, seats and other external parts look new, and the engine and all the other parts inside the car, including its internal parts when the bonnet is lifted up, look nice and appear to be in good condition?

To me, as long as there is no certificate by an authorised car inspector to certify that the second-car is good in all aspects, the term 'in showroom condition' is just a sales gimmick to tell the car buyer that the car is good when seen both outside and inside. In other words, they are telling the buyer the car is good in every aspect, including the engine parts, for a second-hand car of that age.

I would like to hear more because my friend and her husband are adamant that I am wrong and they are right; "in showroom condition" to them, means the car is good, both in looks, and all the other aspects, including the engine and all the other parts, and no certificate confirming its quality is needed.

To me, 'in showroom condition' means that the second-hand car looks great both inside and outside, and the salesman states this to boost his chances of selling the car.

Thanks in advance.
 
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Tan Elaine

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Hi everybody

I would like to hear from some member/s please. Being a non-native puts me in a distinct disadvantage.

Thanks in advance.
 

BobK

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FYI: A car in a showroom, that could be offered for sale though not in showroom condition, might be an 'ex-display model'.

b
 

Tan Elaine

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FYI: A car in a showroom, that could be offered for sale though not in showroom condition, might be an 'ex-display model'.
b
May I know what 'ex-display model' mean? Does it mean that it was displayed in a showroom before and was removed, but later displayed in a showroom again? Thus, although it is in the showroom, the car may not be in good condition both internally and externally.

Thanks in advance for your guidance.
 

Linguist__

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If the car is second-hand, then I would say 'in showroom condition' just refers to how the car looks.

I don't know how the law is there, but for a car to be allowed on the road here (UK), it must be checked by a mechanic and pass a test. This must be completed every 3 years. When you buy a car second-hand, there is usually a document which details when the last check was done by a mechanic. If this was recently, then you can assume the engine etc is fine.

A good way to check how 'showroom condition' the car is would be to look at how many kilometers/miles it has on the speedometer. I'm not knowledgeable about cars, but the more Km/miles it has, then the less 'new' it is. That is, if the car was second-hand, and was owned for 2 years previously, but had only driven a few hundred miles, the engine would be in good condition. In the same time period, 2 years, a car could be driven for thousands of miles. In which case, the engine would be in worse condition.

So, what I'm saying is that a salesperson's 'advertising' isn't really what you should base the condition of the car on. That said, the salesperson's 'advertising' shouldn't be misleading.
 

BobK

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An 'ex-display model' (or just 'display model') has been on display (as a new car), and taken out for an unknown number of test drives. So it may have only one previous owner (the dealer), but not be entirely new.

b
 
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