Mrs\Miss\Ms

Which do you use?


  • Total voters
    272

Ambition

New member
Joined
Aug 10, 2009
Member Type
Other
Before i try to read the others' answers, I write my answer in order to examine my knowledge as the following:

Mrs. is used for the women who i know excatly she is married.

Miss > No information about its use.
Ms. is used if I do not know if the person is married or not.



Now i am ready to ready your answers.:-?
 

yllkiSSima

New member
Joined
Aug 20, 2009
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Albanian
Home Country
Albania
Current Location
Albania
Mrs\Miss\Ms

Can anyone help me with the phonetic trascription of Mrs\Miss\Ms? :roll:
Thank You!
 

Huda-M

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Urdu
Home Country
Pakistan
Current Location
Pakistan
MRS we usually say like misses

Miss pronounced as miss.

Ms, also pronounced as Miss.
 

map

Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2009
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Vietnamese
Home Country
Vietnam
Current Location
Vietnam
What do you need help with, cu8gul?
hello teacher, my name is Map, I'm from Vietnam, this is the first I join forum, i hope that Teachers will help me to improve my English, I am thanks !!!!!:lol::-o
 

The Majesty

Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2010
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Arabic
Home Country
Saudi Arabia
Current Location
Saudi Arabia
actually, I prefer Ms to mrs

to show some respectful
 

EngFan

Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2010
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Quechua
Home Country
Qatar
Current Location
Argentina

capng

New member
Joined
Oct 27, 2010
Member Type
Other
Is this just a free for all where everyone puts up a random answer no matter how wrong it is??

The poll doesn't even include correct punctuation for American/Canadian English...I'm not a teacher (so take this with a grain of salt), but somebody had to step in...

**Bottom line- this is the correct usage in America (British is the same just no periods):

"Miss" is used for young girls, unmarried women, and can be used if you are not sure whether or not they or married. It is pronounced exactly how it looks. It does not require a period since it is not an abbreviation.

"Ms." is used for unmarried women and is the default (the title one should use) if you are not sure whether or not they are married. In British English there is no period. In America, it is pronounced sort of like "miz" or "miss," thus, it is sometimes hard to differentiate by ear alone. In some other countries, it is prounced differently.

"Mrs." is used for married women (and widows). It is also used by many unmarried women in business, politics, and other positions of power or prestige. In British English there is no period. It is prounounced "missus" or "missis" (although there is no actual phonetic spelling for the word).

"Mr." is used for all men (regardless of marriage status).

These titles all came from different combinations and adaptations of Mister and Mistress. That is the most basic answer. It gets much more complicated than that as far as where the terms came from and how they've changed in usage over the years.

Good luck Misters and Misses!
 

Amal-30

Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2009
Member Type
Other
Native Language
Arabic
Home Country
Saudi Arabia
Current Location
Saudi Arabia
I use Ms only with a woman if I don't know she is married or not.
Mrs if I know that a woman is married.
Miss with a girl that I know she is not married.
 

Amal-30

Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2009
Member Type
Other
Native Language
Arabic
Home Country
Saudi Arabia
Current Location
Saudi Arabia
Is this just a free for all where everyone puts up a random answer no matter how wrong it is??

The poll doesn't even include correct punctuation for American/Canadian English...I'm not a teacher (so take this with a grain of salt), but somebody had to step in...

**Bottom line- this is the correct usage in America (British is the same just no periods):

"Miss" is used for young girls, unmarried women, and can be used if you are not sure whether or not they or married. It is pronounced exactly how it looks. It does not require a period since it is not an abbreviation.

"Ms." is used for unmarried women and is the default (the title one should use) if you are not sure whether or not they are married. In British English there is no period. In America, it is pronounced sort of like "miz" or "miss," thus, it is sometimes hard to differentiate by ear alone. In some other countries, it is prounced differently.

"Mrs." is used for married women (and widows). It is also used by many unmarried women in business, politics, and other positions of power or prestige. In British English there is no period. It is prounounced "missus" or "missis" (although there is no actual phonetic spelling for the word).

"Mr." is used for all men (regardless of marriage status).

These titles all came from different combinations and adaptations of Mister and Mistress. That is the most basic answer. It gets much more complicated than that as far as where the terms came from and how they've changed in usage over the years.

Good luck Misters and Misses!

I did not read all the answers here but you made the answer of the poll very clear to me.

Would you mind telling me what is your source?
 

5jj

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
Czech Republic
Current Location
Czech Republic
I did not read all the answers here but you made the answer of the poll very clear to me.

Would you mind telling me what is your source?

I don't know whether capng found this somewhere, or wrote it himself. If the latter, then it can be our source from now on. It summarises the actual situation very neatly.

There is only one thing I have doubts about: It is also used by many unmarried women in business, politics, and other positions of power or prestige. I have come across this in Germany with Frau (=Mrs), but I have not encountered it with the English word - at least not in the UK. Perhaps capng would care to comment on this.
 

keen learner

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2010
Member Type
Other
Native Language
Hindi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
Mrs- sounds the same as misses.
Ms- Americans tend to say 'miz' and British 'muz'.
Miss- pronounced as written.
'muz'
Is it the cup sound or the schwa sound?
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
I use a schwa.
 

Timmy010

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2012
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
German
Home Country
Germany
Current Location
Germany
The same problem exists in French, too. (mademoiselle or madame) It seems only a femal problem, because the male adress doesn't discriminate between a married or unmarried man. Because of gender equality women required to abolish "mademoiselle" in official administrations. In Luxemburg they succeeded now: In future there will be no "mademoiselle" in official documents. Here the full Articel (german) wort.lu/de/view/schluss-mit-mademoiselle-4f758448e4b091a01f189eaf .
 
Top