My friend left language course half way through.

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tufguy

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"My friend was learning Spanish but he left it in the half way through or part way (I mean in the middle). He didn't complete the course. I was discusing this with him on Skype and one of my friends also joined us. We were having a discussion over this and he left the chat in the middle. He didn't want to discuss it."

Please check.
 

tufguy

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"My friend was learning Spanish but he didn't complete the course. I was discusing this with him on Skype and one of my friends also joined us and he left the chat in the middle. He didn't want to discuss it."
 

tufguy

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Once again, there is too much repetition. If he left the course in the middle, there is no need to add that he didn't complete it. If you were discussing it and a friend joined you, there is no need to say again that you were discussing it. Try again.

"He left it in the half way through or part way (I mean in the middle)." Actually I was seeking your views on this line. Is it fine to say "half way through" or "part way" or "in the middle"?
 

emsr2d2

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"Halfway through" and "in the middle" mean the same thing. "Part way through" simply means he started it but left before finishing it.
 

tufguy

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"Halfway through" and "in the middle" mean the same thing. "Part way through" simply means he started it but left before finishing it.

So, any of these can be used, did I get it right?
 

emsr2d2

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They're all grammatically correct but you can only use the one that's actually true. He can't have left exactly in the middle and​ just part way through.
 

tufguy

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They're all grammatically correct but you can only use the one that's actually true. He can't have left exactly in the middle and​ just part way through.

So, please tell me the correct way.
 

emsr2d2

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I can't. I don't know when he left!
 

emsr2d2

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He left three-quarters of the way through.
 

tufguy

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He left three-quarters of the way through.

If I say he left it in the month of April, then I will say "He left the language course one-quarter of the way through", is it correct?

If I say he left it in the middle of the month of November, then what we need to say? And suppose he left it in the month of Feburary, then what we need to say?
 
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emsr2d2

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Bear in mind that I only suggested using "three quarters of the way through" because your original question suggested that you wanted to use phrases like "halfway through" etc.
In reality, I wouldn't say any of them. I would say "He started a one-year course in January but left in February/April/August/November".
 

tufguy

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Okay I understand but could you please tell me whether my sentence is correct or not? And could you please answer those questions as well?
 

Rover_KE

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If I say he left it in the middle of the month of November, then what do we need to say? And suppose he left it in the month of February, then what do we need to say?
Say it like that. It's exact enough for most purposes.

Why do you need to express the time of leaving as a precise fraction of a year?

If it started on 1st January and he left on 15th November, you can say he left the course after 319/365ths of a year (320/366ths if it was a leap year).

(I'm pretty sure I got that right.

'Please check.')
 
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