noun or adverbial noun

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Kendama

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Hi,

In the sentence,

He should have been home

what part of speech is 'home'? Is it a noun or an adverbial noun?

Thanks!
 

ratóncolorao

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Hi,

In the sentence,

He should have been home

what part of speech is 'home'? Is it a noun or an adverbial noun?

Thanks!

First to say that I am neither a teacher nor a native speaker.

Subject: He
Verb: should have been
Where? Complement of place : home

Correct me if I am wrong :roll:
 

rws_killer5

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An adverbial noun acts as an adverb by indicating distance, time, weight, or value. If a noun indicates “how much” or “to what degree” an action or state exists, the noun is acting as an adverb. Adverbial nouns are sometimes called adverbial objectives.

Home does not indicate distance, time weight or value. It is merely a noun.
 

ratóncolorao

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An adverbial noun acts as an adverb by indicating distance, time, weight, or value. If a noun indicates “how much” or “to what degree” an action or state exists, the noun is acting as an adverb. Adverbial nouns are sometimes called adverbial objectives.

Home does not indicate distance, time weight or value. It is merely a noun.[/QU

I think I am a bit confused. Let's see:
I should have been home or I should have been at home
Which I think they both have the same meaning - Then taking the second example to argue about the question made by the first poster, we have a noun, of course, but in a prepositional phrase - at home - which is functioning as a complement of place or if you want an adverbial phrase which refers to a place.
Therefore, home is a noun but in this particular sentences is functioning as an adverb of place.


In the following example :
The woman who lives next door is a doctor

we have something similar : where does she live? Next door - adverbial phrase, as far as it tells us about the place where this person lives.

Correct me if I am wrong. Thank you
 

ratóncolorao

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I would like to ask about another thing:
Is it not right that all kind of adverbial phrases can be made by adding a preposition? Thus, we can have :

Manner: with a hammer
Place: next door
Time: before summer
Frequency : every month
Purpose: for his mother


Thank you
 

TheParser

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An adverbial noun acts as an adverb by indicating distance, time, weight, or value. If a noun indicates “how much” or “to what degree” an action or state exists, the noun is acting as an adverb. Adverbial nouns are sometimes called adverbial objectives.

Home does not indicate distance, time weight or value. It is merely a noun.[/QU

I think I am a bit confused. Let's see:
I should have been home or I should have been at home
Which I think they both have the same meaning - Then taking the second example to argue about the question made by the first poster, we have a noun, of course, but in a prepositional phrase - at home - which is functioning as a complement of place or if you want an adverbial phrase which refers to a place.
Therefore, home is a noun but in this particular sentences is functioning as an adverb of place.

In the following example :
The woman who lives next door is a doctor
we have something similar : where does she live? Next door - adverbial phrase, as far as it tells us about the place where this person lives.

Correct me if I am wrong. Thank you





































***NOT A TEACHER***

Good morning.

(1) Your question about "home" is very interesting.

(2) I thought you would like to know what some books say.

(a) Most books seem to agree that "home" is an adverb when used with verbs of motion.

(i) He sent her home./ She has gone home./I was home by six o'clock (the idea of motion is implied)/ He will be home tomorrow ("will be" = will come/will arrive).

(b) Use "at home" for a state of being (She is at home./ She was home all last week).

Thank you.
 
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