Nouns that consist of (verb+preposition)

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Maria311

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I am trying to learn about these nouns but I don't know what they're called.
When someone is looking for something what is the noun used for that? Is it look-out or look-in? I am on the (.....) for the answer? What goes in the gap?
I am trying to think of verbs that go with prepositions to form nouns but online dictionaries aren't helping me because I don't know the proper way to search for them. Do these nouns have a certain name?
Is there a noun than can be formed from (study+preposition)?
I know what output means, but when I say input, does it mean it's something I am putting in something else? Like "my input to the lecture was valuable"? Am I getting it right?


+One more question that's been puzzling me but it's not about that,
when I want to say my apartment is near a garden, do I say it looks down a garden, or it looks over a garden?

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emsr2d2

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I am trying to learn about these nouns but I don't know what they're called.
When someone is looking for something what is the noun used for that? Is it look-out or look-in? I am on the (.....) for the answer? What goes in the gap?
The word that goes in the gap is "lookout" - no hyphen. "To be on the lookout for something" means to be alert for, to keep an eye out for. The noun "lookout" is of course a place where people used to stand to "look out" for invaders. The action is "to look out" but the people and the places became known as "lookouts".

I am trying to think of verbs that go with prepositions to form nouns but online dictionaries aren't helping me because I don't know the proper way to search for them. Do these nouns have a certain name?
In the case of "lookout", although the word came from the phrasal verb "to look out", I wouldn't say that the word "lookout" is exactly "a verb that goes with a preposition".

Is there a noun than can be formed from (study+preposition)?
I don't really understand this question. Do you want to make a word which starts with "study" and ends with a word that happens to be a preposition when used on its own, but the two together make another word?

I know what output means, but when I say input, does it mean it's something I am putting in something else? Like "my input to the lecture was valuable"? Am I getting it right?
Your input in a lecture is your contribution. If you sat through a lecture, didn't ask any questions and didn't say a word, you gave no input at all.


+One more question that's been puzzling me but it's not about that,
when I want to say my apartment is near a garden, do I say it looks down a garden, or it looks over a garden?
This is not connected to the rest of your post. Please start a new thread for this question. It gets far too confusing to have unconnected questions in one thread.

Thank you

See above, in red.
 

Maria311

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"I don't really understand this question. Do you want to make a word which starts with "study" and ends with a word that happens to be a preposition when used on its own, but the two together make another word?"

It either starts with study and ends with a preposition, or the other way around. And they should together form a noun, I couldn't guess any.

I will post my last question in a new thread, thank you.
 

emsr2d2

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I can't think of any. Why do you need one?
 

Maria311

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I remember reading something like this somewhere, it was related to kings or presidents' helpers or something. I am trying to remember the word, I may be mistaken after all.
 

BobK

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In the late sixties and early seventies, the sit-in became a commonplace of student politics (it was the occupation by protesters of some area of a building usually controlled by the authorities). And when you stay in bed for a while after you wake up i's called a lie-in. So I suppose if a number of people got together to study (before an exam, say), it would make sense to call it a 'study-in'; but I've never heard or used it.

b
 

Maria311

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In the late sixties and early seventies, the sit-in became a commonplace of student politics (it was the occupation by protesters of some area of a building usually controlled by the authorities). And when you stay in bed for a while after you wake up i's called a lie-in. So I suppose if a number of people got together to study (before an exam, say), it would make sense to call it a 'study-in'; but I've never heard or used it.

b

Thank you very much.
I'm not sure it is the word that's in my head. I believe I read about it, it was to describe the job of the vice-president in relation to the president himself. I think a noun was used with the word study, maybe it wasn't with a preposition but I'm sure I heard the word study joined by another word to form a noun. >_<
By the way, is the word "kickoff" as in the start of something used in proper English or only in informal language?
 

emsr2d2

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Are you sure you're not thinking of "stand-in". That's a person who does someone else's job for a limited period of time.
 

BobK

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:up: Sounds likely.

And 'kickoff', meaning beginning, is informal. Another related usage - even more informal - is the euphemistic 'it all kicked off' [a fight started].

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