NT Endings

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Carolina1983

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Hello, all!

When you say "I can´t understand", "You mustn´t imagine", "I went away", "I didn´t like her", is it fair to say that, in all such cases, t is, still, present? Somehow?
In other words, is it okay to say that, within a particular accent, nt endings will retain some of the t, both before vowels and consonants?




Thanks!
 

billmcd

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Hello, all!

When you say "I can´t understand", "You mustn´t imagine", "I went away", "I didn´t like her", is it fair to say that, in all such cases, t is, still, present? Somehow?
In other words, is it okay to say that, within a particular accent, nt endings will retain some of the t, both before vowels and consonants?




Thanks!

Yes, but using one of your examples, "mustn't", the first "t" is silent and the word would be pronounced "muhssent".

 

SoothingDave

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The "t" is swallowed up in some accents. "I don't want to" sounds like "I doe wanna."
 

billmcd

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The "t" is swallowed up in some accents. "I don't want to" sounds like "I doe wanna."

I understand, but my advice to non-native speakers of English (and, in fact, many native speakers) would be to learn, practice and use the correct/proper pronunciation.
 

Carolina1983

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Yes, but using one of your examples, "mustn't", the first "t" is silent and the word would be pronounced "muhssent".



Hello again, thanks billmcd. Just to add a bit more info, this question arose because I kept reading that General American will suppress the t in "I can´t understand", that is, the n will link to the vowel. To me, it sounded off, as I felt some of the t was left. I don´t even know where I´m going with this anymore lol Wrapping it up, bear with me, this poor student lol In all words that end in NT (contractions and non-contractions), is it ok for me then to tell my students a slight t remains? I´m sorry to go at it again, just a tricky subject in my view. Thanks!
 

billmcd

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Hello again, thanks billmcd. Just to add a bit more info, this question arose because I kept reading that General American will suppress the t in "I can´t understand", that is, the n will link to the vowel. To me, it sounded off, as I felt some of the t was left. I don´t even know where I´m going with this anymore lol Wrapping it up, bear with me, this poor student lol In all words that end in NT (contractions and non-contractions), is it ok for me then to tell my students a slight t remains? Absolutely! As faint and as subtle as it might sound, it should be noticeable. Otherwise it could be understood as an affirmative statement. It might be helpful to have your students to exaggerate or emphasize the "t" until it becomes more natural and evident. I´m sorry to go at it again, just a tricky subject in my view. I understand.:) Thanks!

b.
 

Rover_KE

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Carolina, instead of sending your thanks in a separate message, just click the Like button, please.

The reason is that it is flagged as a new post, so we think you might have a follow-up question or something to add. Those of us with slow internet connections and/or old computers have to waste valuable time waiting for it to appear.

Thank you.

Rover​


 

Carolina1983

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Hello! Something else occurred to me. Why does it sound like there´s no t left in 'center' and 'went away', but it does sound like there´s a t in 'can´t understand´, 'hadn´t 'understood'? Is there a rule at all for this? Thanks!
 

5jj

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Hello! Something else occurred to me. Why does it sound like there´s no t left in 'center' and 'went away',
There is a fairly clear /t/ in most dialects of BrE.
 

SoothingDave

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Hello! Something else occurred to me. Why does it sound like there´s no t left in 'center' and 'went away', but it does sound like there´s a t in 'can´t understand´, 'hadn´t 'understood'? Is there a rule at all for this? Thanks!

I don't know who you are listening to. I am just as likely to lose the "t" sound in any of those. Unless I am deliberately talking "formal."

If I say "I can understand" and "I can't understand" the difference is in vowel sound and emphasis and not the presence of a "t."
 
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