Pass the parcel

canadalynx

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Hello.

Is the expression "pass the parcel" common in your area?
 

5jj

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Yes, as the name of a children's party game.
 

canadalynx

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I guess no one wants to get the parcel if it's the parcel of blame...
 

probus

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It's not unknown here in Canada, but I'd hardly call it common. I suppose it's a less rowdy version of musical chairs.
 

Skrej

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I've never heard of it either. Is it the same thing as what we'd call a game of 'hot potato' in AmE?

Occasionally I'll use hot potato as an icebreaker or filler activity with an ESL class, where everyone has to utter a particular English word or phrase before passing the ball on.

Speaking of rowdy musical chairs - I once tried a modified version of musical chairs with grammar as well. Once. At the time, I was teaching in a classroom with rolling chairs on a hard linoleum floor. In retrospect, I should have known the chairs would slide wildly out of control and bodies would end up on the floor. Fortunately, there was only minimal bruising and nothing broken. This only made the students love the game more, but I firmly denied any requests to continue after the first round. Mind you these were adults, too, not children.

Also - latchcomb!
 

canadalynx

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Yes, I think they are similar.

"Latchcomb"? You can certainly count me out.
 

emsr2d2

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In "Pass the parcel", the children's game, a parcel is passed around a group of children while music is playing. When the music stops, whoever is holding the parcel removes one layer of paper. The music then restarts and the same things happen. Each time a layer of paper is removed, the children are closer to the prize/present that's hidden in the centre of the parcel. The aim is to be the person holding the parcel when the music stops, when there is only one layer of paper left to unwrap, so that you take off that last layer of paper and win the thing in the centre. When I was a child, there was just one present, wrapped in multiple layers of paper. Over the intervening years, I understand that it has become popular for a small gift (a single sweet or something similar) to be concealed under each layer of paper, with the main present in the centre being a bigger, more valuable item. As far as I can tell, this is because children didn't like taking off a layer of paper only to find that there was nothing underneath it! For me, that's faintly ridiculous and defeats the object of the game! But I grew up in the days when kids didn't constantly expect to get something for nothing.
 

Charlie Bernstein

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I've never heard of it. Sounds like fun!
 

Tdol

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I understand that it has become popular for a small gift (a single sweet or something similar) to be concealed under each layer of paper, with the main present in the centre being a bigger, more valuable item. As far as I can tell, this is because children didn't like taking off a layer of paper only to find that there was nothing underneath it!


How about a participation certificate as a sugar-free alternative?
 
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