[Grammar] Please help to explain on this phrase meaning.?

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n4me

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Don't run and walk in line = don't run and don't walk in line

Is it the same meaning?
How if this order phrase: Don't run, Please walk in line. Like this we don't use conjunction "and" so it wouldn't confuse the meaning to don't run and (don't) walk in line. Am I right?

Help to explain this grammar rule of this conjuntion rule "don't" + verb + and + verb. Thanks
 

Raymott

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Don't run and walk in line = don't run and don't walk in line

Is it the same meaning?
How if this order phrase: Don't run, Please walk in line. Like this we don't use conjunction "and" so it wouldn't confuse the meaning to don't run and (don't) walk in line. Am I right?

Help to explain this grammar rule of this conjuntion rule "don't" + verb + and + verb. Thanks
If this construction leads to an ambiguous sentence, you shouldn't use it.
In speech, the intonation would usually give the meaning.
"Don't drink and drive" is unambiguous to a native speaker. It means "Don't drive after you've been drinking alcohol"
So, it means: Don't [A and B].
Your sentence means: Don't A and Do B.
Another meaning is: Don't A and Don't B, as in "Don't do drugs and engage in antisocial behaviour."
Don't A and Don't B = Don't [A or B].

When this construction is used, you can usually tell its meaning from the context. Naturally, it's often used ambiguously.

PS: The best fix for your sentence is: "Walk in line and don't run."
 
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