[Grammar] randomer/randomest/more random/most random

inase

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It seems there is a word "randomest" (superative) but no "randomer" (comparative).

Given this information, I wonder if you use these forms interchangeably.

1. He selected the candidate in the randomest way.
2. He selected the candidate in a randomer way than she did.
3. He selected the candidate in the most random way.
4. He selected the candidate in a more randomer way than she did.

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GoesStation

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A series is either random or periodic. It's not possible for something to be more random than something else.
 

inase

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A series is either random or periodic. It's not possible for something to be more random than something else.

In terms of the level of randomness in integers between 0 and 9, 0<1<2.

0. 12123322123123123312341231231
1. 21321332145313490112123123131
2. 15421901871982710297819038761

Inase
 

inase

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Why would anyone want a comparative and a superlative for 'random' anyway? It's not a question of randomness, it's a question of how uniformly distributed the objects are.

Yes, in a natural setting which was created by God, there is no comparison in randomness. However, suppose someone created a random function like randomize() which generates random numbers. Depending on the quality of the function or whether the user initialize the starting value, randomness changes.
 
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GoesStation

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On reflection I've come to realize that randomest may actually exist in casual speech. Some people use "random" as a pejorative term for "not thought out". Such a person (Bill Gates is a famous example) might well say That's the randomest thing I've ever heard.
 

jutfrank

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Returning to the original post, grammatically-speaking only the first three sentence are correct. Instead of 2. and 4. you could say:

He selected the candidate in a more random way than she did.
He selected the candidate more randomly than she did.
 
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