runny/running nose

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Tan Elaine

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I remember reading that 'running nose' and 'runny nose' are synonymous. However, recently, I read that 'running nose' is incorrect. The dictionaries I referred to, does not have the term 'running nose'.

I would like to know whether native speakers use 'running nose'.

Thanks in advance.
 

vil

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I’m not a teacher.

Hi Tan Elaine,
running nose = runnynose
suffering from a cold = with a running nose

I had a running nose and a sore throat. Also I had a splitting headache and a cough. My whole body ached.

Its usual symptoms are a running nose, sneezing, a rise in temperature, headache, sore throat, chill, aches and pains in the body, and loss of appetite. The skin around the nostrils may become sore.

Get rid of a stuffed or running nose without drugs.

Running Nose Treatment - Cold Herbal Remedies - Stuffy Nose Remedies - Nasal Decongestant Sprays Treatment for cold

YouTube - Running Nose - How To Treat

Regards,

V.
 

Barb_D

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As an American English speaker, I would never refer to a running nose.

You say "My nose is running" but "I have a runny nose."

I don't know why - but that's how we say it.

I may hear "My nose is runny (and my head hurts and I have a sore throat, etc.)" but not "I have a running nose.

So, in short - after the verb, either one, but before the noun, only "runny."
 

emsr2d2

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As an American English speaker, I would never refer to a running nose.

You say "My nose is running" but "I have a runny nose."

I don't know why - but that's how we say it.

I may hear "My nose is runny (and my head hurts and I have a sore throat, etc.)" but not "I have a running nose.

So, in short - after the verb, either one, but before the noun, only "runny."

I entirely agree - a runny nose OR my nose is running.
 

Tdol

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There are examples of running nose in use on websites, but I agree with the posters above completely- it sounds strange to me.
 
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