'Sneak', 'tell-tale', 'whistle-blower', and 'dobber'?

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Mehrgan

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Hi,

Are all these terms used in BrE? I was wondering if any was used more commonly in everyday English.
 

Rover_KE

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'Sneak', and 'tell-tale' are more likely to be used by children.

Criminals use 'snitch', 'squealer' and 'grass'.

'Whistle-blowers' reveal wasteful practices or corrupt activity by their bosses at work.

'Dobber' is chiefly use informally in Australia and New Zealand.

Rover
 

emsr2d2

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I agree with Rover on all but the final point. "Dobber" was regularly used when I was at school and we frequently referred to "dobbing someone in". I have been known to use the last phrase more recently too, usually in a joking fashion.
 

BobK

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I agree with Rover on all but the final point. "Dobber" was regularly used when I was at school and we frequently referred to "dobbing someone in". I have been known to use the last phrase more recently too, usually in a joking fashion.
Quite understandable. A lot of features of current Australian started life in local English usages.

b

PS I remember a playground chant/taunt:

Tell-tale-tit
Your tongue shall be slit
And all the dogs in the town
Shall have a little bit.​
 
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