The firework.

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tufguy

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"The USA does fireworks on their independence day."

"We do fireworks on Diwali."

"He did fireworks on New Year eve."

Please check.
 

Tdol

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If you use USA as a singular collective noun, why do you use their?
 

SoothingDave

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Independence Day is a proper noun. It should be capitalized. I think you mean to say that people in the USA use or "shoot off" fireworks on Independence Day. "Does" works, but it's a catchall verb.

"New Year's Eve" uses the possessive.
 

tufguy

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Independence Day is a proper noun. It should be capitalized. I think you mean to say that people in the USA use or "shoot off" fireworks on Independence Day. "Does" works, but it's a catchall verb.

"New Year's Eve" uses the possessive.

Could you please tell me what is the way to use "firework" in a sentence with the help of my sentences (I mean after correcting them)?
 
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tufguy

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"The USA does it's fireworks on Independence Day." Can we say like this?

"The people in the USA use or shoot off fireworks on Independence Day."

Please tell me about the usage of the word "firework". I tried myself but I am still confused.
 
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Raymott

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You let off fireworks. I don't think I've ever heard 'firework'.
I'm sure the Americans have fireworks more than once a year.
 
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emsr2d2

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In the UK, we "let off" or "set off" fireworks on multiple occasions. When I was a kid, we only let them off on Firework Night (aka Bonfire Night aka Guy Fawkes' Night) - November 5th. These days, they're available year-round and people buy them for birthdays, Christmas, New Year, funerals, you name it. There are also many public firework displays throughout the year, although there are still more around November 5th.

I wouldn't say that we "do" fireworks. I'd use "let off", "set off" or "have".

A: What are you doing for your birthday?
B: We're going to go out for a few drinks then go back to Dave's house for a barbecue, cocktails and we're going to have fireworks!
A: Sounds great. Can I come?
B: No. Sorry. Do you remember the last time we let you anywhere near fireworks? You nearly burnt the house down.
A: Ah. Yes. I did. I'll stay at home. Have a great time!
 

tufguy

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We have fireworks on Diwali.

Tom had fireworks in front of his house.

They let off fireworks every day.
 

emsr2d2

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The first and third are OK. The second could be ambiguous - did Tom set off fireworks in front of his house or was there a firework display taking place in front of his house?
 

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You let off fireworks. I don't think I've ever heard 'firework'.
I'm sure the Americans have fireworks more than once a year.

We don't use "let off." Shoot off or set off.

Fireworks displays are common on the 4th of July, but you also see them as an attraction at other events (community festivals, carnivals, etc.)
 

Tdol

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We let them off in BrE.
 

tufguy

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We don't use "let off." Shoot off or set off.

Fireworks displays are common on the 4th of July, but you also see them as an attraction at other events (community festivals, carnivals, etc.)

So what do Americans say?
 

tufguy

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The first and third are OK. The second could be ambiguous - did Tom set off fireworks in front of his house or was there a firework display taking place in front of his house?

Tom let off fire works in front of his house.

Tom had fireworks in front of his house. (It means firework display took place there, can we say fire works were displayed?)

We have fireworks on Diwali. Does it mean a firework display takes place? Do I need to say we let off fireworks?
 

tufguy

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Tom let off fireworks in front of his house.

Tom had fireworks in front of his house. (It means a firework display took place there. Can we say fireworks were displayed?)

We have fireworks on Diwali. Does it mean a firework display takes place? Do I need to say we let off fireworks?
 

tufguy

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One word.
No. Note yet another comma splice. [sigh]
Not necessarily.

We can't say "fireworks were displayed" or "fireworks show took place". Is it correct?
 

emsr2d2

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"Fireworks were displayed" only works when you are talking about the counter in a shop which sells fireworks. In that case, you could say "The fireworks were displayed in a locked glass cabinet."

"Fireworks show took place" is incorrect. First, you need an article at the beginning. In BrE, it's called a "fireworks display". That can "take place".
 
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