The most delicious vegetarian...

Silverobama

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When I was in Shenzhen (back in 2010), I often went to my uncle's vegetarian restaurant. One of the dishes (actually it was not a dish because it was the food wasn't served in a dish) is called "alfalfa sprout cone" (I made up this name), they used alfalfra sprouts, vegetarian pork floss, cucumber, green laver to make it look like an ice-cream cone. The green laver was usually a square shape, then they laid the alfalfra spourts, cucumber and pork floss on the green laver, then make it cone. I wrote a sentence to express the idea:

The most delicious vegetarian food I've eaten is alfalfa sprout cones.

I don't think "alfalfa sprout cones" makes sense to you. Is there a better alternative to avoid the problem?
I think "vegetarian food" here is okay and more general.
I haven't eaten that for many years, so I don't know if "is" in the sentence is okay too.

Please help me to make my italic sentence natural.
 

Tdol

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It makes sense in the context that the alfalfa sprouts were shaped to look like an ice-cream cone. Without that context, I would have no idea what the name of the dish meant.
 
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emsr2d2

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What exactly is pork floss? I've never heard of it. If it's pork, it has no place in a vegetarian dish or restaurant!

Also, I think you mean "layer", not "laver".
 
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Silverobama

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Much appreciated, Tdol and emsr2d2.

It makes sense in the context that the alfalfa sprouts were shaped to look like an ice-cream cone. Without that context, I would have no idea what the name of the dish meant.
Yes, that's why I said I think it's better to say something else instead of "alfalfa sprout cones". Perhaps I can simply mention "alfalfa sprouts".

What exactly is pork floss? I've never heard of it. If it's pork, it has no place in a vegetarian dish or restaurant!
I agree. It's has nothing to do with meat. My uncle is a buddhist and I love his vegetarian food very much. My spoken English teacher at that time (who had already been a vegetarian for nine years) enjoyed eating food there. My spoken English teacher doesn't eat meat at all. Once we went to a restaurant together and he spat out the dumpling he ate when he found out that there was minced shrimps in it. We didn't see or know that at all. So, my uncle's restaurant is 100% vegetarian.

In his restaurant, he serves steak which looks like really steaks but actually were made from soybeans. Here's a picture of pork floss. However, the "pork floss" my uncle used is vegetarian too.

I wonder if there's a better way to express the idea.
 

probus

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Some vegetarians consume dairy products and some even eat eggs. Those who are strictly vegetarian are often called vegan.
 

Tarheel

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Pork floss is made from pork. (No surprise there!) I guess you could say it's a vegetarian version of pork floss (without the pork).
 

emsr2d2

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Some vegetarians consume dairy products and some even eat eggs. Those who are strictly vegetarian are often called vegan.
No vegetarian would eat pork, though. "Vegan" doesn't mean "strictly vegetarian". It means vegan!

Many people don't like such labels but for anyone who's interested:

Lacto-ovo-vegetarian - Doesn't eat meat/fish/poultry but eats dairy and eggs
Lacto-vegetarian - Doesn't eat meat/fish/poultry/eggs but eats dairy
Ovo-vegetarian - Doesn't eat meat/fish/poultry/dairy but eats eggs
Plant-based - Refers only to diet. No meat/fish/poultry/dairy/eggs/honey or leather but might use products derived from live animals (wool, silk)
Vegan - Refers to whole lifestyle. No meat/fish/poultry/dairy/eggs/honey/leather/wool/silk/lanolin.

To clear up any confusion about "live animals", that doesn't include using dairy. Even though milk is taken from a living animal, dairy cows have a very miserable life and are usually killed as soon as their milk-producing days are over. Also, in order for people to get the milk from dairy cows, the calves are taken away from the cows when they are extremely young. The calves are usually killed for veal or taken away to become other dairy cows or fattened up for beef.
 
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