The most popular idioms or proverbs

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Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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If going at the necessary speed. ;-)
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
If going at the necessary speed. ;-)
 
G

green_summer

Guest
RonBee said:
Never has it rained cats and dogs,
But sometimes it rains frogs.

:wink:
In China, we often use " rains cats and dogs " :) When I use this idiom first time, I felt it is very funny, how can the cats and dogs be rained?? *_*
 
G

green_summer

Guest
RonBee said:
Never has it rained cats and dogs,
But sometimes it rains frogs.

:wink:
In China, we often use " rains cats and dogs " :) When I use this idiom first time, I felt it is very funny, how can the cats and dogs be rained?? *_*
 

twostep

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2004
RonBee said:
""Hanging up goat's heads and selling dog meat" does, no doubt, mean that the seller is advertising one thing and selling another. (Apparently, goat meat is considered preferable to dog meat.) I don't think that particular expression will catch on here (USA).

:)

In German you would call it literally translated a roof rabbit (Dachhase) = cat. The term probably goes back to hard times when meat was scarce and feral cats plenty.
 

twostep

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2004
RonBee said:
""Hanging up goat's heads and selling dog meat" does, no doubt, mean that the seller is advertising one thing and selling another. (Apparently, goat meat is considered preferable to dog meat.) I don't think that particular expression will catch on here (USA).

:)

In German you would call it literally translated a roof rabbit (Dachhase) = cat. The term probably goes back to hard times when meat was scarce and feral cats plenty.
 

bmo

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2003
green_summer said:
RonBee said:
Never has it rained cats and dogs,
But sometimes it rains frogs.

:wink:
In China, we often use " rains cats and dogs " :) When I use this idiom first time, I felt it is very funny, how can the cats and dogs be rained?? *_*

From: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/298100.html

Meaning: Raining very heavily.

Origin: The phrase is supposed to have originated in england in the 17th century. City streets were then filthy and heavy rain would occasionally carry along dead animals. Richard Brome's The City Witt, 1652 has the line 'It shall rain dogs and polecats'. Also, cats and dogs both have ancient associations with bad weather. Witches were supposed to ride the wind during storms in the form of cats.
 

bmo

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2003
green_summer said:
RonBee said:
Never has it rained cats and dogs,
But sometimes it rains frogs.

:wink:
In China, we often use " rains cats and dogs " :) When I use this idiom first time, I felt it is very funny, how can the cats and dogs be rained?? *_*

From: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/298100.html

Meaning: Raining very heavily.

Origin: The phrase is supposed to have originated in england in the 17th century. City streets were then filthy and heavy rain would occasionally carry along dead animals. Richard Brome's The City Witt, 1652 has the line 'It shall rain dogs and polecats'. Also, cats and dogs both have ancient associations with bad weather. Witches were supposed to ride the wind during storms in the form of cats.
 
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