[Vocabulary] The opposite of easy-going

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elenah

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Hi there,
Could you tell me what is the opposite of "easy-going" if we are talking about a person?
Thank you in advance
 
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There are several, depending on context. Strict was the first word that popped into my mind.
 

Tarheel

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Pain in the neck, perhaps?
 

TheParser

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NOT A TEACHER


Many Americans might say something like, "Be very careful how you deal with him. He is very high strung." (sensitive and nervous)
 

jutfrank

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Of course it depends on what you mean by easy-going. If you mean 'easy to please', I'd suggest 'a difficult person'.
 

Skrej

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tightly wound, wound up tight.

Since easygoing has several meanings, the best antonym might vary by context.
 

Narkises

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I have a problem; because no one corrected the grammar mistake in the first post, I have to ask that which one is true:

"Could you tell me what the opposite of... IS?"
Or
"Could you tell me what IS the opposite of...?"

May I use the second form? It is very usual and easy to say. Moreover, I've seen many learners who don't care about it.
 

Tarheel

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1. There is no grammar mistake to correct.
2. Either way is perfectly okay.
 

GoesStation

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Neither sentence is true, nor is either of them false. They are both correct. :)
 

Narkises

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1. There is no grammar mistake to correct.
2. Either way is perfectly okay.

If my memory serves me right, a teacher told me that "that clause" shouldn't be in question form! Could you tell me that ...?
 

Narkises

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Neither sentence is true, nor is either of them false. They are both correct. :)

Thank you. I always use "true" instead of "correct" by mistake. :oops: It's unconscious! That's because we have one word in Persian for them.
 

Barb_D

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I have to disagree with some of my fellow moderators and other natives speakers. In careful writing, I would say "Can you tell me what X is?" not "Can you tell me what is X?"

The longer the phrase, the more likely we are to move the verb up before it: Can you tell me what are the highest point of altitude and lowest point of altitude you'd reach if you took Route 66 from the beginning to the end? That's pretty long and moving the "are" doesn't bother me there at all, but in the original sentence, I do feel the "is" belongs at the end.
 

bigC

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1. There is no grammar mistake to correct.
2. Either way is perfectly okay.

Are both sentences correct?

"Please tell me what the opposite of... IS?"
and
"Please tell me what IS the opposite of...?"
 

Matthew Wai

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I think what you quoted has already indicated both are correct.
 

bigC

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I think what you quoted has already indicated both are correct.

I have seen in former discussion of sentence structure similar to the two sentences, someone commented, sentence structure similar to first sentence should be used.

Sentence with structure similar to second sentence is incorrect, or it sounds unnatural.(I can't remember what the exact wording was)

Can I also write "I can't remember what was the exact wording."?
 
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GoesStation

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Can I also write "I can't remember what was the exact wording."?

No. Was should come last in that statement.
 

Tarheel

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You could also say:

I can't remember the exact wording.
 
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