The secretary of the firm need to make an introduction of the company and herself.

Status
Not open for further replies.

Jit833

Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2012
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
Malaysia
Current Location
Canada
1) The secretary of the firm need to make an introduction of the company and herself when answering call, therefore she needs to be familliar with the introduction script/line.

2) The secretary of the firm need to introduce herself and the company when answering call, therefore she needs to have an introduction script/line.

Are the above sentences correct? I am not sure if there is such a terminology call introduction script/line. For example: Hi, good morning, this ABC firm this Aly speaking, how can I help you today?
What is that script called?

Thanks for helping. :-D
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
1) The secretary of the firm needs to make an introduction of the company and herself when answering a call, therefore she needs to be familliar with the introduction script/line.

2) The secretary of the firm needs to introduce herself and the company when answering a call, therefore she needs to have an introduction script/line.

Are the above sentences correct? I am not sure if there is such a terminology call introduction script/line. For example: Hi, good morning, this ABC firm this Aly speaking, how can I help you today?
What is that script called?

Thanks for helping. :-D

Please see my additions in red. Neither of your examples are very natural. Receptionists don't "introduce" themselves or their company when they answer the phone. They "identify" themselves. In fact, I'm not sure that receptionists do that in the UK. They normally only say the name of the company.

I wouldn't use "Hi" in a formal situation. "Good morning/afternoon/evening. ABC Limited. How can I help you?"
 

5jj

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
Czech Republic
Current Location
Czech Republic

Odessa Dawn

Key Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2012
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Arabic
Home Country
Saudi Arabia
Current Location
Saudi Arabia
Or, as many of them have been trained to say these days, "How may I help you?". :-(



How may I help you? and How can I help you?; How can I serve you?; May I help you?; What Can I do for you?In what way can I serve you? (Usually said by store clerks and food service personnel. The first question is the most polite, and the last is the least polite.) Waiter: How can I help you? Sue: I'm not ready to order yet. Clerk: May I help you? Jane: I'm looking for a gift for my aunt.
How may I help you? - Idioms - by the Free Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.




To be honest with you, I don’t understand why the word "May" has been underlined? Having checked the Free Dictionary and found that "How may I help you"? is the most polite question. So, apologize for being curious, but as you know that I do live in environment where English is rarely spoken. As a result, this forum is the only place where I can ask questions and get your insightful, definitive answers. Thank you for being generous and patient.

 

5jj

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
Czech Republic
Current Location
Czech Republic
It's simply that few native speakers naturally say 'How may I help you?' What we say naturally in English is 'Can I help you?'
 

Jit833

Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2012
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
Malaysia
Current Location
Canada
Please see my additions in red. Neither of your examples are very natural. Receptionists don't "introduce" themselves or their company when they answer the phone. They "identify" themselves. In fact, I'm not sure that receptionists do that in the UK. They normally only say the name of the company.I wouldn't use "Hi" in a formal situation. "Good morning/afternoon/evening. ABC Limited. How can I help you?"
Thanks for replying. They "identify" themselves. Can I say company and self indentify script?
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
Thanks for replying. They "identify" themselves. Can I say company and self indentify script?


No. That is extremely unnatural.
 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
You could say 'the phone-answering protocol'.

Rover
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
Or the "telephone-answering script", or "script for use when answering the phone". However, I would say that the simple lines "Good morning. How can I help you?" don't really qualify as a script.
 

Barb_D

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 12, 2007
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I have to say, though, I like it when the person says their name. "ABC Company. This is Mary Ellen. How can I help you?"

When they do that, I always greet them back by name. "Hello Mary Ellen. Could you please connect me to Archibald Leach?"
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
I find the name-giving part a little over-familiar. I have no need for the receptionist's name unless, at the end of the call, he/she has done a particularly good or bad job and I wish to report that fact back to the company.
 

5jj

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
Czech Republic
Current Location
Czech Republic
I find the name-giving part a little over-familiar. I have no need for the receptionist's name u.
I agree. It's also pretty pointless, as I don't catch it anyway. Still, that's the way it is these days. Those of us old enough to remember Archibald Leach just have to accept it.
 

Barb_D

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 12, 2007
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I believe this to be an American/British cultural difference.

My husband works in retail and it's really disheartening the way some poeple act as though the people taking care of them (whether in a shop, a bank, a restaurant, the garage, etc.) are automatons without any humanity. Sometimes patrons won't even look you in the eye - you exist solely to wait on them. Then there are other people who do recognize that you are, in fact, a fellow member of their species. I don't mean you become best buds, get invited to dinner, or get a Christmas card. But for the time you interact, you are treated as a human. Using the person's name is one way to show you recognize they are a person, not a robot and not your servant. I've watched my husband, time after time, greet the salesperson or counterperson by name (they usually have on a nametag) and have seen the effect it has on the encounter. I do realize that this would be overly famliar in other nations, but in the US, it establishes rapport. "Oh wow! She treats me like I'm a human being."
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
I think it must be an American/British thing. My mum has the habit of reading the name on a nametag and then saying "Thanks very much, Louise" (or whatever name!), and she says the name very pointedly as if to say "Ooooh, look at me, I noticed your name!" It makes me cringe.
 

5jj

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
Czech Republic
Current Location
Czech Republic
I think it must be an American/British thing. My mum has the habit of reading the name on a nametag and then saying "Thanks very much, Louise" (or whatever name!), and she says the name very pointedly as if to say "Ooooh, look at me, I noticed your name!" It makes me cringe.
If my mother did that, I would never go shopping with her. I hate people who hardly know me bandying my name about as if they were my best friend, and I would not dream of using other people's names unless they had been introduced to me, albeit very informally.

I have been known to make the occasional comment in this forum that is not intended to be taken seriously, but I was very serious in that first paragraph.
 

SoothingDave

VIP Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
A lot of times I hear from a waitress "if you need anything, my name is Sue." One at least one occasion I have asked what their name was if I didn't need anything.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top