This coming Sunday", "This Sunday" or "Next Sunday"?

Tan Elaine

Key Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
English
Home Country
Hong Kong
Current Location
Hong Kong
Today is Thursday. In three days it is Sunday.

Do we say "This coming Sunday", "This Sunday" or "Next Sunday"?

Thanks.
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Number 1 and 2 work. If today is Thursday, May 4th, I would understand "next Sunday" to be Sunday, May 14th.

"Next Xday" is imprecise. We use it frequently, and it's nearly always understood, but its meaning varies depending on how many days it is till the nearest Xday. If today were Monday and you said "next Sunday", I'd ask you whether you meant the nearest upcoming Sunday or the one after that. The safest thing is to use number 1 or 2, or simply say "Sunday".
 

bhaisahab

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 12, 2008
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
Ireland
All three are fine in BrE.
 

bhaisahab

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 12, 2008
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
Ireland

jutfrank

VIP Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2014
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
To me, in your case "next Sunday" sounds more like next week and not "this Sunday".
 

jutfrank

VIP Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2014
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
To me, in your case "next Sunday" sounds more like next week and not "this Sunday".

Yes, to me too. I'm sure there's no difference between BrE and AmE on this point.
 

bhaisahab

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 12, 2008
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
Ireland
If I wanted to refer to Sunday the 14th of May today, I would say 'Sunday week' or 'a week on Sunday' not 'next Sunday'. Sunday the 7th is obviously the next Sunday after Thursday the 4th. I would most probably use 'on Sunday' or 'this Sunday' to refer to Sunday the 7th, but I might use 'next Sunday'.
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I learned "Sunday week" when I lived in Toronto. It's a shame we don't have this useful expression in American English.
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I learned "Sunday week" when I lived in Toronto. It's a shame we don't have this useful expression in American English.

I don't find the term "Sunday week" intuitive to understand. It means a week from Sunday, doesn't it?
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
It does, but many of these time expressions that could extend beyond the simplest calendar view can easily get unclear.
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I don't find the term "Sunday week" intuitive to understand. It means a week from Sunday, doesn't it?

Yes. It took me a while to grasp that, but once I did, I found it a really handy phrase. You can understand it as "Sunday plus a week."
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Well, handy in Canada or England but certainly not in America (which is something our student should take notice if he/she wants to live in America).
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
So Americans would certainly not like 'Sunday fortnight' or 'a fortnight on Sunday'.
I'm afraid not. I don't recall hearing "fortnight" used when I lived in Canada but perhaps it still has some currency there. For some reason the word has completely fallen out of use in American English.
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
So Americans would certainly not like 'Sunday fortnight' or 'a fortnight on Sunday'.

I think it is fine to use that if you don't want to be understood. ;-)
 
Top