[General] to turn on somebody

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vil

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Dear teachers,

Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences?
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[FONT=&quot]He never felt like a foreigner in Spanish and they did not really treat him like a foreigner most of the time. They turned on you often, but they always turned on everyone. (E. Hemingway)[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]The big fleshy brunette was busy…. He made a timid gesture with his hand. “A cup of tea, please.” The brunette turned on him urgently. (A. Sillitoe)[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]If he came home late, and she reproached him, he frowned and turned on her in an overbearing way. (D. Lawrence)[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]to turn on somebody = to face in hostile manner, attack[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]V.[/FONT]
 

BobK

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...
[FONT=&quot]to turn on somebody = to face in hostile manner, attack[/FONT]
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[FONT=&quot]V.[/FONT]

:up: (And be careful with the word order. 'To turn somebody on' could be said to involve an attack, but not a hostile one. ;-))

b
 

SoothingDave

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I read the first sentence more in a metaphorical way than a literal way. If someone is friendly to you but then suddenly treats you in a hostile manner, they can be said to "turn on you."
 
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