TPR

shlux

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Hello teachers, I'm here to ask you a few questions about TPR (Total Phisycal Respond) if you don't mind.
Do you know tpr (Total Phisycal Respond) ?
Do you use it ?
how's effect to your students ?
Thank you for responding, I really appreciate that !
 

emsr2d2

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Hello teachers.

I'm here to ask you a few questions about TPR (Total Physical Response). if you don't mind.
Do you know about tpr TPR? (Total Physical Response)? Do you use it? How 's does it affect to your students?

Thank you for responding. I really appreciate it! that !

Welcome to the forum.

Please note my corrections above. It's important to follow these rules of written English at all times:
- Start every sentence with a capital letter.
- End every sentence with one appropriate punctuation mark.
- Don't put a space before a full stop, comma, question mark or exclamation mark.
- Always put a space after a full stop, comma, question mark or exclamation mark.

There is no need to put each sentence on a separate line. Put sentences that have a logical connection to each other on the same line.

There is no need to thank us in advance. Thank us after we help you, by clicking on the "Thank" icon (hover over "Like" to find it).

Until this thread, I had never heard of TPR. Out of curiosity, what prompted you to ask us about it? Your member profile says you are a Student or Learner. Are you training to be an English teacher?
 

Skrej

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I've never actually used it in my classes, but I did once attend a brief session about it as part of a larger profession development seminar. We played the role of students tasked with learning some obscure academic vocabulary. As a student, I found it highly annoying, but perhaps that's just my personal style of learning. It may also have been the fact that it was the last session in the seminar and I was just anxious to get started on the 5 hour drive home.

We did things like walk up and touch the corresponding picture posted on the wall, repeat and define the word while untying a knotted rope (before passing the rope to the next person in a relay), and other activities that kept us literally on our feet for the entire hour-long session.

I suppose the fact that I never adapted it into my teaching speaks to my impression about it.

I think it's a technique that probably works better with energetic young learners than adult learners. My students were adult learners who came to classes after a full day of work, often physical labor. I don't think they would have appreciated spending another hour walking around the room, clapping hands, and similar physical activity. Also, it's potentially embarrassing for anyone who's shy or self-conscious.- again, children tend to be less reserved about such things.

Supposedly it's based on the principals of how we learn a language as a child, so again, I think it's better geared towards younger learners. It's been well established that we learn differently as adults than we do as children.
 

shlux

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Welcome to the forum.

Please note my corrections above. It's important to follow these rules of written English at all times:
- Start every sentence with a capital letter.
- End every sentence with one appropriate punctuation mark.
- Don't put a space before a full stop, comma, question mark or exclamation mark.
- Always put a space after a full stop, comma, question mark or exclamation mark.

There is no need to put each sentence on a separate line. Put sentences that have a logical connection to each other on the same line.

There is no need to thank us in advance. Thank us after we help you, by clicking on the "Thank" icon (hover over "Like" to find it).

Until this thread, I had never heard of TPR. Out of curiosity, what prompted you to ask us about it? Your member profile says you are a Student or Learner. Are you training to be an English teacher?
Exactly Sir, I am training to be an English teacher.
 

jutfrank

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I agree it's far better suited to young (or younger) learners. Do I use it in my own lessons? Certainly not in the kind of way shown in the video below, but the main principles, which I believe to be at the root of many invaluable teaching methods, absolutely yes.

Here's a video showing TPR in its 'full effect':
 

emsr2d2

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Exactly. Sir, I am training to be an English teacher.

Please don't refer to users here as "Sir". Not only is it overly formal, but it also suggests that you automatically assume we're all male. We're not.
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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I agree it's far better suited to young (or younger) learners. Do I use it in my own lessons? Certainly not in the kind of way shown in the video below, but the main principles, which I believe to be at the root of many invaluable teaching methods, absolutely yes.

Here's a video showing TPR in its 'full effect':
That would honestly not work with me as a leaner. As a child, that would be different.
 
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