[Vocabulary] What do 'Monday' and 'Friday' call in English?

yi-ing

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2017
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Tamil
Home Country
Singapore
Current Location
Singapore
Lets consider this week:
Today is Wednesday.
Yesterday was Thursday.
Tomorrow will be Thursday.

What do 'Monday' and 'Friday' call in English?
 

yi-ing

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2017
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Tamil
Home Country
Singapore
Current Location
Singapore
Thanks Piscean.
so those days don't have specific name.
How about Saturday and Sunday?
Are they called "two days after tommorrow and two days before yesterday"?
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Thanks Piscean.
so those days don't have specific name.
How about Saturday and Sunday?
Are they called "two days after tommorrow and two days before yesterday"?
No. If today is Wednesday, there are fixed ways to refer to Monday ("the day before yesterday") and Friday ("the day after tomorrow"), as well as Tuesday and Thursday ("yesterday" and "tomorrow" respectively). Beyond that, you have to use the name of the day, prefaced with "this" if there's a risk your interlocutor won't know you're talking about the current week.

Note the correct spelling of "tomorrow".
 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
yi-ing, do the days you are asking about have specific names in Tamil?
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
We call Friday, Saturday and Sunday "the weekend."
 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
In British English, we only call Saturday and Sunday 'the weekend'.
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
In British English, we only call Saturday and Sunday 'the weekend'.
Ditto for American English, unless we're talking about a place that uses a different weekend. It's Friday and Saturday in Israel and some Muslim countries, and Thursday and Friday in some other Muslim countries.
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
The typical workdays in the US are Monday to Friday but I definitely consider Friday night part of the weekend. Many people agree with me and many don't but all I know is if someone asks me about my weekend plans I would certainly include my Friday night plans.
 

ambitious-girl

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2017
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Persian
Home Country
Iran
Current Location
Iran
Ditto for American English, unless we're talking about a place that uses a different weekend. It's Friday and Saturday in Israel and some Muslim countries, and Thursday and Friday in some other Muslim countries.
Thursday and Friday are the weekend in my country. The week starts with Saturday.
Do the days you are asking about have specific names in Tamil?
In Persian, the day after tomorrow and two days as well as one day before yesterday have specific names too.
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Note that this thread's title should have been What do you call 'Monday' and 'Friday' in English? or What are 'Monday' and 'Friday' called in English?
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
No, they don't. [STRIKE]have.[/STRIKE]

You can say either "No, they don't" or "No, they don't have specific names in Tamil". You can't end the sentence at "have".
 

Roman55

Key Member
Joined
Feb 5, 2014
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
British English
Home Country
Italy
Current Location
France
But you can end the sentence with haven't.

No, they haven't.
 
Top