What do you call a person who has never worked their entire life? Retired?

Ashraful Haque

Senior Member
Joined
May 14, 2019
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Bengali; Bangla
Home Country
Bangladesh
Current Location
Bangladesh
I'm mot quiet sure how to answer the following questions. I'll be answering the questions on behalf of my grandma who doesn't speak English. So I'm basically going act as her translator. These are some embassy interview questions.

1) What do you do for a living? How much do you earn?
My grandmother has been a housewife her entire life. I'm confused about this question since I can't say she is retired. How do I say she doesn't work and her children take care of her?

2) How will you be financing your trip?
3) How much do you think your stay in the US will cost you?

Answer 2: Her son will sponsor the trip.
Answer 3: She has no idea since her son, who is a US citizen, has always sponsored her/her trips/stays?

Is 'sponsor' a good word to use here? If so. Is sponsor a trip/stay correct? Lastly, can you sponsor a person?
 

5jj

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
Czech Republic
Current Location
Czech Republic

SoothingDave

VIP Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
You can say she is a homemaker or that she "doesn't work outside of the home."

I think "sponsor" is fine.
 

probus

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 7, 2011
Member Type
Native Language
English
Home Country
Canada
Current Location
Canada
My understanding is that "sponsor" is a defined term in US legislation related to immigration. I once tried to get my brother, a US citizen, to sponsor me for a green card.
 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
Like Soothing Dave, I’d call her a homemaker, and say she had never had paid employment.

’Sponsor’ is not used in that sense in BE.
 

tedmc

VIP Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2014
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
Malaysia
Current Location
Malaysia
I think "sponsor" is used in official context, e.g. a company sponsoring a football match, or an event.
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
In immigration terms, "sponsor" is used extensively in the UK (and at British embassies/consulates etc). It's what they call the person who is going to be responsible for a visitor to the UK during their stay. The sponsor doesn't have to completely cover the costs of the trip but the visitor is expected to stay at that person's home and the sponsor would be expected to help them out if, for some reason, they lost all their money! It depends, to a certain extent, on the nationality of the visitor to the UK, the prevailing economy of that person's country and the recorded history of immigration abuse by people from that country/region. It's called profiling. It's always been done and it always will be. It can dictate whether someone is granted a visa or, for people who don't need a visa on arrival, whether they're granted leave to enter on arrival.
 
Top