What does it mean to say "buzz attraction"?

Aamir Tariq

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If someone is buzzing attraction, does it mean that he or she is drawing attention to him or herself?

Regards,
Aamir the Global Citizen
 

probus

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It is not an expression I have ever run across. Please provide the context in which you found it.
 

Aamir Tariq

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It is not an expression I have ever run across. Please provide the context in which you found it.

Here are a couple of examples that I have just googled. But the phrase is being used as a noun in both. However there was a video in which an American lady was using "buzz" as a verb.

He gives me a little wink, and a little buzz attraction wriggles in my stomach. “Flatterer,” I say, unable to suppress a grin.

Toowong is one of Brisbane’s most sought after pockets, with elite schools and an area that is truly seen as the 2nd Business District of Brisbane. This location provides ease of access to Brisbane Boys College, Stuartholme Catholic Girls, St Peters Lutheran College, amongst many others, and of course easy bus access to The University Of Queensland. With the recent Toowong Village renovation completed end of 2015, the café and nightlife has become a buzz attraction and all is once again within walking distance.
 

probus

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Must be Strine, I guess. Ray? Anybody?
 

Skrej

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I haven't heard the phrase 'buzz attraction' until this thread.
 

TheParser

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If someone is buzzing attraction, does it mean that he or she is drawing attention to him or herself?


NOT A TEACHER

Hello, Aamir:

I think that it is accurate to say that here in the (United) States, we use the verb (attract) + noun (buzz) combination.

My example: I have opened a new restaurant, but business is poor because this district is full of restaurants serving the same kind of food. Do you have any suggestions on how I can attract/create some buzz ( = have people start paying attention to my restaurant)?
 

Aamir Tariq

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NOT A TEACHER

Hello, Aamir:

I think that it is accurate to say that here in the (United) States, we use the verb (attract) + noun (buzz) combination.

My example: I have opened a new restaurant, but business is poor because this district is full of restaurants serving the same kind of food. Do you have any suggestions on how I can attract/create some buzz ( = have people start paying attention to my restaurant)?

Beautiful example, and thanks for explaining so well. In your example attracting buzz means to attract people's attention. In which attract is being used as a verb and attention as a noun. But what about "Buzz attraction", in the examples above. Is that being used as a compound noun or noun phrase and is it also used in the reverse order I mean "buzz attraction" instead of "attract some buzz"?
 

jutfrank

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The phrase is new to me, too.

It seems to be working as a compound noun, where both buzz and attraction are nouns.
 

TheParser

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Hello, Aamir:

I went to the "News" section of Google and found two news items that may interest you.

1. "But the new big-buzz attraction is the R80 million Wild Waves Water Park." (Independent Online, January 23, 2013)

a. I assume that it would have been too wordy to write something like: "But the new attraction that is creating a big buzz is …."
b. I believe that "R80 million" refers to the word "rand," the name of the currency in South Africa.

2. "The show, which has been a big-buzz attraction in other cities, includes an adult mummy." (San Antonio Express, September 26, 2012)
 
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