[Idiom] What is a good expression instead of " Don't be tired "

Kuzey27

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Hello, I'm Persian.
We have an expression in Persian like this : "Don't be tired!"

It is used when you see someone who has been busy for a while or just has finished some work.
Now he may be tired and you want to express "I wish you not be tired"
Some times we use it in order to thank that person.
Note this expression is used at end or start of a conversation (in Persian)

What is the nearest expression in English to this one?
 

emsr2d2

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I can't think of a similar expression. If I saw someone who had just finished work and I knew they had a hard job or a really long day, I might say "Hi. I hope you're not [too] tired". However, it's not a standard phrase at the beginning or end of a conversation.
 

Lynxear

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I agree with emsr2d2. I don't think there is a single phrase or word for what you are describing.

English though has no problem borrowing words from other languages if they fit. A good example is the French phrase "deja vu" (spelt in an English fashion). It is impossible to describe a deja vu situation in less than 2-3 sentences in English, such an elegant phrase.

If I was a manager and I saw an employee who worked hard and looked tired afterward. I might say:

You look beat. Why don't you take the rest of the day off and relax?

"Beat" in this context means "tired" in common speech. You could also say "tired".


You look tired. Why don't you take the rest of the day off and relax?


 
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andrewg927

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"You're tired, just call it a day".
 

shimacatu_sa

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Could I use the expression "you must be worn out" at the both beginning and end of a conversation?

(The beginning)
You must be worn out. You worked so hard to get this done.
Then the conversation continues........

(The end)
Thank you for your hard work. You must be worn out.

"You must be worn out" is literally opposite to the original expression "I wish you not be tired", but I thought it could imply appreciation if I use the right voice tone.

Please correct me. Thank you.
 

emsr2d2

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You could use that phrase just about anywhere in a conversation. If used at the end, though, I would expect there to be at least something else after it, even if it's only "Thanks" or "Goodbye".
 

bubbha

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We don't really have a set expression for this in English.

Even though I'm not a native speaker of Chinese, I can immediately think of an appropriate equivalent in Chinese. It's "辛苦了" (xin ku le) which basically means "[You've/we've/I've] been working hard."

If your boss says it to you after a long day of hard work, it would mean "I appreciate your effort" or "Thanks for your help" (an expression of gratitude).

If a co-worker says it to you, it would mean "It's been a [long/tough/hard/rough] day" (an expression of commiseration).

If you describe your day to a friend or spouse, they might say it to you, in which case it would mean "Wow, it must have been tough" or "You must be exhausted" (an expression of empathy).

Perhaps some of these phrases might suit your needs.
 

Kuzey27

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Thanks.
One of my teachers sometime told me some expression : "Don't work hard!"
May this expression be near to mine?
 

andrewg927

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"Don't work hard" means "you can slack off". "Don't work too hard" means "work hard but don't push yourself too hard".
 

Lynxear

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Thanks.
One of my teachers sometime told me some expression : "Don't work hard!"
May this expression be near to mine?



I would say "Don't work so hard".

I would want that person to work hard and do their best. However, I don't want them to work so hard that other important things in life become neglected.
 
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