[Grammar] what's the adj of fasting ( man who don't eat for some reasons)

Status
Not open for further replies.

Hekmat Mrad

New member
Joined
Jun 22, 2010
Member Type
Student or Learner
We learned that "interasted" is the adj from interest
so is it possible to add ed to "fast" in order to form adj Ex. I'm fasted ( not taken any food ) .
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
We learned that "interasted" is the adj from interest
so is it possible to add ed to "fast" in order to form adj Ex. I'm fasted ( not taken any food ) .

I can't think of any way of saying it as an adjective. As far as I know, it can only be used as a verb or a noun:

I'm fasting.
I was fasting.
I fasted for three days last year.

He is on a fast.
She is going to try a fast next week.

I'm honestly not sure if there's a specific verb that should be used with "fast" as a noun (by this I mean I don't know if one "goes on a fast", "does a fast" etc), as it's normally simply used as a verb on its own.
 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
I can't think of any way of saying it as an adjective. As far as I know, it can only be used as a verb or a noun:

I'm sure you're right, emsr.

I wondered about a fasting blood-test, when you eat or drink nothing for 12 hours before the test. But it's not an adjective as it doesn't describe blood-test. It's one noun modifying another.

I can't find any dictionary listing an adjectival form of fast.

Rover
 

BobK

Harmless drudge
Staff member
Joined
Jul 29, 2006
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
:up: While we're on the subject of fasting, the meal in which you break your nightly fast is breakfast (with, as most forum members will know, a shortened /e/ sound in the first syllable.) In rather old-fashioned Br English it is possible to use 'breakfast' as a verb, with a regular simple past ending. So it's possible - if rare - to say 'he has breakfasted'.

b
 

bertietheblue

Senior Member
Joined
May 21, 2010
Member Type
Other
Native Language
English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
Just to say, you can talk about 'fasting patients' when discussing hospital treatment of someone on a fast.
 

BobK

Harmless drudge
Staff member
Joined
Jul 29, 2006
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
:up: That's a good point. In a multi-cultural environment such as this forum it's easy to assume that fasting is a strictly religious practice. But hospital patients do fast when required, and hospital induction questionnaires often have a check-list that includes a question such as 'Do I need to fast before the appointment, and if so for how long?'

b
 

bertietheblue

Senior Member
Joined
May 21, 2010
Member Type
Other
Native Language
English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
:up: That's a good point.
b

It would have been a good point had I not been thinking of patients fasting during Ramadan and the protocols hospitals have to follow when administering drugs during the hours of fasting.:-(
 

BobK

Harmless drudge
Staff member
Joined
Jul 29, 2006
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
It would have been a good point had I not been thinking of patients fasting during Ramadan and the protocols hospitals have to follow when administering drugs during the hours of fasting.:-(

:) I hadn't thought of that.

b
 

Raymott

VIP Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
English
Home Country
Australia
Current Location
Australia
We learned that "interasted" is the adj from interest
so is it possible to add ed to "fast" in order to form adj Ex. I'm fasted ( not taken any food ) .
Adjectives can be formed from both the present and past participles.
"I am fasting" can be both a sentence in the present progressive tense, and a description using the adjective "fasting" - "I am fasting. I am a fasting person."

If you have fasted overnight for above-mentioned fasting blood test, not only have you fasted, you are fasted. You are a fasted person. In fact, they sometimes ask you, when you turn up for such a test, "Are you fasted?"

fasting, adj. in a state of refraining from food.
fasted, adj. In a state of not having eaten for a specified period.
 

Raymott

VIP Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
English
Home Country
Australia
Current Location
Australia
That sounds awfully posh to me. I take it you're on private health insurance. :-D
Maybe we Aussies are just more au fait with the requirements for blood tests?
Anyhow, I did say "sometimes". So this dialogue isn't unusual, especially if you know the pathology lady (which it invariably seems to be):

Me: "I'm here for a fasting blood test."
Path. Lady: "So, are you fasted?" (Yes, she's a bit of a smart alec.)

Actually, they usually ask, "When did you last eat?", but that doesn't help much with the topic of the thread. ;-)
 

vil

Key Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Bulgarian
Home Country
Bulgaria
Current Location
Bulgaria
I'm not a teacher.

I can't think of any way of saying it as an adjective. As far as I know, it can only be used as a verb or a noun:

You have to know that even a man of moderate means takes advantage of the the opportunity to make use of the key word “fasting” as an adjective or an adverb.

fasting (adj)
What is Permitted for a Fasting Person?
So I will reward the fasting person for it and the reward of good deeds is multiplied ten times.

fasting (adv) = on an empty stomach
If hydrochloric acid is taken fasting without the addition of food to digest, it will cause a warm to burning sensation in the stomach.

Regards,

V.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top