[Vocabulary] When the subject is the English language, how can there be a "closed" Thread?

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GaryP

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When the subject is the English language, how can there be a "closed" Thread?

I've gotten tired of kowtowing to my spell checker when I try to say presumedly and it wants me to say presumably. Even here, the former word is red lined, as if somehow inferior to the other words here. Kowtowing is OK, but presumedly is not?

To my way of thinking, the "closed" thread on presumedly errs when it says the two words at issue mean the same thing. Presumably means that one has the ability to presume something about something; presumedly means that one already has.

The tense in the state of mind of the actor is significant, is it not?:roll:

This is my first time use of an emoticon; please be gentle with me.
 

emsr2d2

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Re: When the subject is the English language, how can there be a "closed" Thread?

Welcome to the forum. :hi:

Spellcheck is probably in the same situation I am - it thinks it's not a real word. I was very surprised to find (one) listing for it in Google, with "supposedly" given as a synonym. The example sentence given for it is "He is presumedly buried in Tanglewood Cemetery". I would word that as "He is presumed to be buried in ...".

Until today, I don't think I'd ever come across the word.
 

Skrej

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Re: When the subject is the English language, how can there be a "closed" Thread?

One can always right-click on any "misspelled" word that has the red underlining and add it to your custom dictionary.

If I use a word frequently enough I get tired of the false flags from spell-checkers, I'll add the word. If it's not a word I use frequently, I generally just ignore the alert, after confirming I have indeed spelled it the intended way.
 

Rover_KE

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Re: When the subject is the English language, how can there be a "closed" Thread?

To my way of thinking, the "closed" thread on presumedly errs when it says the two words at issue mean the same thing. Presumably means that one has the ability to presume something about something; presumedly means that one already has.
Presumably, the closed thread on 'presumedly' to which you refer is this one.

Threads are closed automatically when no further contributions have been made after a certain period of time.
 

GoesStation

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Re: When the subject is the English language, how can there be a "closed" Thread?

Some writers enjoy resurrecting words that have fallen out of use. They are welcome to practice their hobby, but I think they go too far if they complain that the literate public or the infrastructure of writing doesn't support it.

Google's ngram viewer finds not one instance of presumedly in the 19th or twentieth century. Why not let it rest in peace?

Would the revived word presumedly fill a niche that isn't already occupied?
 
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Tdol

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Re: When the subject is the English language, how can there be a "closed" Thread?

We can open old threads if people want to add things. They are closed after being inactive for a few months to restrict advertisers and spammers.
 
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