When to use cool and cold

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When do we use cool and cold.
eg: Its very cold outside or should I say its cool over here.
2)In rainy season,what should I say ,
-Its so cool
-The weather is so cool
3) He switches on the AC just for 10minutes so that the room gets cool/cold (Please correct this sentence)
 

hanky

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When do we use cool and cold.
eg: Its very cold outside or should I say its cool over here.
2)In rainy season,what should I say ,
-Its so cool
-The weather is so cool
3) He switches on the AC just for 10minutes so that the room gets cool/cold (Please correct this sentence)

I am not a teacher nor a native speaker.

Cool can mean great, amazing, good looking ...

E.g., You look so cool today...

You can cool down something to make its temperature decreases.

We use cold when we say about weather: it's so cold today. (Not cool)

Hope this helps.
 

emsr2d2

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He turns on the AC to cool the room down!

To cool down - to make something a lower temperature than it was before
 
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He turns on the AC to cool the room down!

To cool down - to make something a lower temperature than it was before
Thanks, but is it right if I say
He turns on the AC to cool down the room !
He turns on the AC so that the room get cooler.( I don't know if this is right,is right to use "get" and "cooler" over here)
 

emsr2d2

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If you say "to cool the room down" it gives no indication of whether the room was hot or cold (or cool) already.

If you say "to make the room cooler" then you have used a comparative, suggesting that the room was possibly cool already, and it's now going to be cooler.

"This room is too hot. Please turn the AC on to cool it down". Makes sense.
"The temperature in this room is quite comfortable, but please turn the AC on to cool it down a little more". Makes sense.
"It's cold in this room. Please turn the AC on to cool it down". This doesn't make sense. If it's already cold, then you wouldn't want (or be able) to cool it down further.
 

BobK

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There's also the positive/negative implication. A cool breeze is pleasant but a cold wind is usually not (in fact, when someone's feelings about coldness are positive, they often reinforce it in some positive way: 'There's nothing wrong with a good cold shower to start the day.'). But 'cold' on its own is often umpleasant:

'Don't you think it's nice and cool with the window open?'
'No - it's too cold.'


b
 
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