which of the variants would you choose

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svetaliya

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Unexpected numbers of young adults are living with their parents. This fact is becoming abundantly familiar as American parents are forced to make room for their children. There is a naïve notion that children grow up and leave home when they are 18, and the truth is far from that. Today, 59% of men and 47%of women between 18 and 24 depend on their parents for housing in this or that way and this is part of a major shift in the middle class.
Analysts cite a variety of reasons for this return to the nest. The marriage age is rising, a condition that makes home and its amenities particularly attractive to young people. A high divorce rate and declining remarriage rate are sending economically pressed and emotionally battered survivors back to parental shelters. For some, the expense of an away-from-home college has become so exorbitant that many students now attend local schools. Even after graduation young people find their wings clipped by skyrocketing housing costs.

Sharing the family home requires adjustments for all. There are the hassles overbathrooms, telephones and privacy. Some families, however, manage the delicate balancing act.

Still, most psychologists feel lengthy homecomings are a mistake. Offspring, struggling to establish separate identities, can wind up with a sense of inadequacy, defeat and failure. And aging parents, who should be enjoying some financial and personal freedom, find themselves bogged down with responsibilities. Living with children of any age involves compromise and obligation, factors that can be detrimental to some aspects of well-being. All children, even adult children, require accommodation and create stress.

Brief visits, however, can work beneficially. They may make parents and their children much closer to each other without being a burden for either part.
I. Are the sentences true or false?
7.
When adult children return home, it is them to need to get used to their parents’ way of life.
8. Most parents expect their lives will change for the better without their children living with them.
9.
Living with parents maybe psychologically harmful.
10.
There seems to be no possible way to handle the problem today.

II. Choose the correct variant (A, B, C or D)
1.
The situation described is something:
b) not very much waited for;
d) not very naïve.

2. It is limited in the text that:
a)
most families feel comfortable when living together;
b)
a few families are able to find a compromise;
c) there is no problem with personal space;
d)
no efforts to solve theproblem are made.

3. According to the text, parents believe that they must:
a)
provide their children with a place to live;
b)
improve their children’s well-being;
c)
enjoy their children;
d)
Establish children’s identities.
4.
One can make a conclusion that parents and children in America are traditionally:
a) very close;
b)a bit distant from each other;

c) glad to visit each other

d) a burden each other.

 
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bhaisahab

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Show Me the Way to Go Home
Unexpected numbers of young adults are living with their parents. This fact is becoming abundantly familiar as American parents are forced to make room for their children. There is a naïve notion that children grow up and leave home when they are 18, and the truth is far from that. Today, 59% of men and 47%of women between 18 and 24 depend on their parents for housing in this or that way and this is part of a major shift in the middle class.
Analysts cite a variety of reasons for this return to the nest. The marriage age is rising, a condition that makes home and its amenities particularly attractive to young people. A high divorce rate and declining remarriage rate are sending economically pressed and emotionally battered survivors back to parental shelters. For some, the expense of an away-from-home college has become so exorbitant that many students now attend local schools. Even after graduation young people find their wings clipped by skyrocketing housing costs.

Sharing the family home requires adjustments for all. There are the hassles overbathrooms, telephones and privacy. Some families, however, manage the delicate balancing act.

Still, most psychologists feel lengthy homecomings are a mistake. Offspring, struggling to establish separate identities, can wind up with a sense of inadequacy, defeat and failure. And aging parents, who should be enjoying some financial and personal freedom, find themselves bogged down with responsibilities. Living with children of any age involves compromise and obligation, factors that can be detrimental to some aspects of well-being. All children, even adult children, require accommodation and create stress.

Brief visits, however, can work beneficially. They may make parents and their children much closer to each other without being a burden for either part.
I. Are the sentences true or false?
7.
When adult children return home, it is them to need to get used to their parents’ way of life.
8. Most parents expect their lives will change for the better without their children living with them.
9.
Living with parents maybe psychologically harmful.
10.
There seems to be no possible way to handle the problem today.

II. Choose the correct variant (A, B, C or D)
1.
The situation described is something:
b) not very much waited for;
d) not very naïve. Neither of these make sense.

2. It is limited in the text that:
a)
most families feel comfortable when living together;
b)
a few families are able to find a compromise;
c) there is no problem with personal space;
d)
no efforts to solve theproblem are made.

3. According to the text, parents believe that they must:
a)
provide their children with a place to live;
b)
improve their children’s well-being;
c)
enjoy their children;
d)
Establish children’s identities.
4.
One can make a conclusion that parents and children in America are traditionally:
a) very close;
b)a bit distant from each other;

c) glad to visit each other

d) a burden each other.


Which ones would you choose?
 

svetaliya

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My answers are:
7. false
8. true
9. true
10. true

1. both variants (b, d)
2. there is a misprint (limited instead of implied)
3. a
4 c
 

svetaliya

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Nobody can help? Noone is interested? Is English your mother tongue? Why don't you send me your variants?
 

5jj

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Nobody can help? Noone is interested? Is English your mother tongue? Why don't you send me your variants?
That approach may well discourage people, svetaliya. People who respond here do so voluntarily in their free time - and some of them spend some time each night in bed, asleep

.
 

svetaliya

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and what about you? do you answer only brief questions?
 

5jj

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