Which preposition is correct (Face of / by) ?

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ben9108

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I would like to seek someone help to solve the below.

1. In addition to the challenge faced of this project, there was a very limited time for us to carry out the installation and commissioning work.
2. In addition to the challenge faced by this project, there was a very limited time for us to carry out the installation and commissioning work.

Which preposition followed the face is correct in the above two sentences?
 

emsr2d2

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Neither is correct. A project can't face challenges. Only the people taking part in the project can face challenges.

"In addition to the challenges faced by the participants in this project, there was very limited time ...". (Note that you don't need an article before "limited time".)
 

Tdol

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How about presented by this project?
 

Matthew Wai

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'Posed by' just struck me.
 

andrewg927

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If you use "...the challenge facing this project", the preposition problem is solved.
 

emsr2d2

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As I pointed out in post #2, the project itself doesn't face challenges. The people taking part in or running the project face them.
 

andrewg927

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In my sentence, "face" means "the project presents these challenges".
 

emsr2d2

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Again, I can only speak for BrE, but I can't see any way of understanding "the challenge facing this project" to mean "the project presents these challenges". That interpretation would be possible with "the challenge presented by this project".
 

andrewg927

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It is fairly common in the US for us to say something like "We need to deal with the problems facing this project." "Face" at least in AE does not just mean "tackle" but also means in the face or presented in the forefront. "I'm facing you" doesn't mean "I'm tackling you" but "I'm in front of you". I remember a student asking why it is possible to say "The banner reads" because technically the banner cannot read but "be read" by someone. I'm not sure how BE handles "read" in this case but it's not uncommon for us to assign a verb to its direct object.
 

andrewg927

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Maybe you haven't read all the previous responses. There is some similarity in that the project cannot face a problem by itself or the banner cannot read itself.

It's not a project facing something. It's something facing a project. Huge difference!
 

andrewg927

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I never said I wouldn't accept it. I said I didn't know whether "the banner reads" was acceptable in BE because it is perfectly fine in AE.
 

Tdol

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"The banner reads" because technically the banner cannot read but "be read" by someone. I'm not sure how BE handles "read" in this case but it's not uncommon for us to assign a verb to its direct object.

This is fine in BrE. We also say that a text reads well.
 

Matthew Wai

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'If you face a particular situation, or it faces you, you have to deal with it.'—quoted from definition #2 in Oxford Learner's Dictionary.

"We need to deal with the problems facing this project."
By definition, this sentence means 'We need to deal with the problems this project has to deal with', which seems weird to me.

Even in Merriam-Webster, an American dictionary, I cannot find a definition that fits the sentence.

However, the literal translation of it in the OP's native language sounds very natural.
 
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