'wicked'

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Odessa Dawn

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The word wicked goes against English common/universal rule that says that after voiceless sounds such as k, the final –ed is pronounced like t. Note that the -e remains silent. "Wicked" ends in a k sound followed by a d sound as a result it was supposed to be blended/wɪkt/ not pronounced as an extra syllable/ˈwɪk·ɪd/. But I had better listen to native speakers and dictionaries.
wicked adjective (BAD)
/ˈwɪk.ɪd/
wicked / w k d/
Question: Do we have words that follow the same pattern when it comes to this exception?


Thank you,
 

5jj

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There is no universal rule such as you mention. 'Wicked' was not 'supposed to be' pronounced as one syllable.

'Naked' is also two syllables.
 

matilda

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I think the "-ed" is pronounced as "t" after voiceless consonants when it's a suffix to a verb (as in washed) but not when the word ends naturally in "-ed" (i.e. when not a suffix, as in cowshed) - note the difference between "moped" (verb) and "moped" (vehicle)
 

BobK

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I think the "-ed" is pronounced as "t" after voiceless consonants when it's a suffix to a verb (as in washed) but not when the word ends naturally in "-ed" (i.e. when not a suffix, as in cowshed) - note the difference between "moped" (verb) and "moped" (vehicle)
:up: This suggests to me a thought experiment. Suppose someone invented a candle that worked without a wick. It's longer-lasting but more expensive that the traditional candles with wicks. Your partner asks you to go shopping and get some candles '- but not those wickless ones. I prefer the old wicked* ones.

*This is a (non-existent) one-syllable word, that would mean - if it existed - 'having a wick'.

b
 
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