with for a Saturday morning lie-in, go through the bills, to make up with

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Ju

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What are the meanings of the phrases have been highlighted as follow?


"Being a single parent ... It's lonely sometimes - and always hard work. As well as the day-to-day stuff there are all the things two parent families take for granted...not having a second opinion in the middle of the night when one of the kids has a temperature; no one to take it in turns with for a Saturday morning lie-in. No one to go through the bills with. No one to go on holiday with. No one to shout at when you're tired and cross and no one to make up with later..."


Tks / ju
 

BobK

Harmless drudge
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What are the meanings of the phrases have been highlighted as follow?


"Being a single parent ... It's lonely sometimes - and always hard work. As well as the day-to-day stuff there are all the things two parent families take for granted...not having a second opinion in the middle of the night when one of the kids has a temperature; no one to take it in turns with for a Saturday morning lie-in. No one to go through the bills with. No one to go on holiday with. No one to shout at when you're tired and cross and no one to make up with later..."


Tks / ju

Look at the context, particularly 'no one to <verb> with'; so your blue highlighting is wrong in linking "with" and "for".

A "lie-in" is when you stay in bed for an hour or two longer than usual.

Going "through the bills with" someone is looking at them one at a time and discussing them.

"Making up with" is settling a dispute.

b
 
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