writing address

tulipflower

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Is the order of underlined words correct in the following address?

No 5
(flat number), Unit 4, floor 16, Alend Street, Tehran, Iran
 

jutfrank

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It doesn't look right, no. Whose address is this?

You have to go first to last from the smallest to the largest. At the moment it appears that there is no street number.
 

GoesStation

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Is the order of underlined words correct in the following address?

No 5
(flat number), Unit 4, floor 16, Alend Street, Tehran, Iran

If that's the format used locally then yes, it's correct. Is there no street number?

Here's a Tehran address I found in Google Maps:

Tehran Province, Tehran, S Jannat Abad Blvd, Iran
 

tulipflower

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In Iran, we start from the largest to the smallest. It was just a sample address. I tried to report it in English. It is not real. We usually give the following information when we want to write the address.

No 5 (I mean flat number), Unit 4, floor 16, 12 Alvand Street, Tehran, Iran
 

GoesStation

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In Iran, we start from the largest to the smallest. It was just a sample address. I tried to report it in English. It is not real. We usually give the following information when we want to write the address.

No 5 (I mean flat number), Unit 4, floor 16, 12 Alvand Street, Tehran, Iran
That's how you should write the address. If you're mailing it (American English)/posting it (British English) from outside of Iran, the local post office will only look at the last line. They'll send it to Iran, where the Iranian post office will interpret the address and, hopefully, deliver it.
 

emsr2d2

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Bearing in mind that you are from Iran, why would you need to know how to construct an address in Iran in English? You would simply write the address exactly the way you know it should look and an Iranian postperson will be able to deliver it.

Isn't it more important for you to learn what an address should look like in an English-speaking country, written in English?
 

GoesStation

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Isn't it more important for you to learn what an address should look like in an English-speaking country, written in English?
That's what I understand the question to be. I think I answered it above. :)
 

emsr2d2

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That's what I understand the question to be. I think I answered it above. :)

You did but I was hoping the OP would clarify why they're asking about addresses in Iran when it seems to be pretty irrelevant to learning English.
 

GoesStation

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You did but I was hoping the OP would clarify why they're asking about addresses in Iran when it seems to be pretty irrelevant to learning English.
I've seen variations of this question before. Learners sometimes want to know how to write an address in their home country on a letter which will be mailed ("posted" in British English) from abroad. The answer is to use the destination country's format with the country's name in English at the bottom.
 

tulipflower

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I just want to know in what order American or Britush people write the address. For example, if someone lives in UK or America or if somebody wants to fill in a form how do they write the adress. This is the question that the learners usually ask in our classes. I gave a Persian address as an example just to make sure about the order. I know we do not need to write our address in English. It was just a simulation. I think I was misunderstood.
 

emsr2d2

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You weren't misunderstood as such, but you chose a poor example. In the UK, the order (for residential addresses) is:

1. Flat number (if needed)
2. Name of block of flats (if needed)
3. House number (this can apply to blocks of flats too)
4. Street name (this goes on the same line as #3)
5. Suburb (if necessary)
6. Town/city name
7. County name
8. Postcode

A really simple address would look like this:
12 Hancock Avenue (house number and street name)
Steyning (name of town)
West Sussex (name of county)
BN17 9AB (postcode)

A more complicated address for someone living in a block of flats would look like this:
Flat 6 (flat number)
Horton House (name of block of flats/name of house containing those flats)
146 Blackwood Road (house/block number and name of street)
Bassett Green (suburb)
Southampton (town)
Hampshire (county)
SO12 7XP (postcode)

Unless we're sending something abroad, we don't put the name of the country at the end.
 

GoesStation

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A charming feature of British addresses is that the longer the address, the smaller the town. American practice is somewhat different. Our addresses are shorter and follow this format:

  1. The name of the recipient, including any legal or professional title as appropriate. Where it makes sense to designate a “care of” forwarder (perhaps the addressee doesn’t live permanently at the stated address), add the name of this person underneath the intended recipient using the abbreviation “c/o.”
  2. The street address. Remember to include the apartment number, where one exists, and any directional information (NW, SE, NE, SW).
  3. The town/city followed by the state and zip code, on one line if it fits. Otherwise, separate the information across two lines.
    For example:

    ANDREA GARCIA
    47 ANYVILLE RD NW #2
    ANYTOWN AZ 01234

    List the state according to its two-letter postal abbreviation. The five-digit version of the zip code will normally suffice, though provide the full nine digits if requested.

    If shipping or mailing from overseas, add a final line for UNITED STATES (or simply USA).
The post office asks us to use all caps. In practice, they're nearly always in mixed case.
 

Tdol

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Apsley House, where the Duke of Wellington lived, had the Best address as it was known as:

Number One
London

It's a duller address today:

149 Piccadilly
London
W1J 7NT
 
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