Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. Newbie
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 2
    #1

    Red face Thank you very much indeed - why "indeed"?

    What is the basic difference between these two expressions:


    1. Thank you very much
    2. Thank you very much indeed


    Why use "indeed" in this case?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: May 2009
    • Posts: 349
    #2

    Re: Thank you very much indeed - why "indeed"?

    "Indeed" is (among other things) a way of emphasizing a superlative.

    "very good indeed" = "very, very good" (roughly)

    I think that is why it is used here.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #3

    Re: Thank you very much indeed - why "indeed"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Flex25 View Post
    What is the basic difference between these two expressions:


    1. Thank you very much
    2. Thank you very much indeed


    Why use "indeed" in this case?

    ********** NOT A TEACHER **********


    Flex,


    (1) It might be helpful if you remember that the word comes from

    two words:

    in + deed (something that has been done)

    In English, some single words were once two words. Of course,

    people speak fast, so they became one word.

    (2) As the other posters have already told you, indeed just

    emphasizes your statement.

    (a) If you say "Thank you," that is fine.

    (b) If you want the other person to know the depth (deepness)

    of your gratitude, you might say:

    [I want to] thank you, indeed [ = I am taking this opportunity to

    really, truly, actually convey my gratitude to you].

    *****


    I found out some helpful information in Professor Quirk's

    authoritative A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language
    (London and New York: Longman, 1985):

    The play [drama on a theater stage] was excellent.

    If you wish to strengthen the adjective "excellent," you can

    say:

    The play was indeed excellent./ The play was excellent indeed.

    As Professor Quirk pointed out, sometimes "indeed" refers to the

    whole sentence:

    Indeed, the play was excellent.

    In that sentence, "indeed" does not refer only to "excellent." It is

    a comment on the whole sentence "The play was excellent."

    Tom: How was the play? Some newspapers said that the play

    was excellent.

    Martha: Oh, yes. Indeed (= the fact is), the play was excellent.


    Thank you & Happy New Year

    P.S. The dialogue between Tom and Martha are only my words.

    It was not in Professor Quirk's book.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 22-Dec-2010 at 14:09.

Similar Threads

  1. [Vocabulary] How do you pronounce "Cotton", "Button", "Britain", "Manhattan"...
    By Williamyh in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 24-Dec-2009, 09:36
  2. "hundreds", "fives", "ones", "Tens", "20s"
    By IMPSX-UE in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-Mar-2009, 19:54
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-Sep-2008, 08:27
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Nov-2007, 12:26
  5. confusing words "expressed" or "express" and "named" or"names"
    By Dawood Usmani in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2007, 19:33

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •