a fact is a description of an event, but not the event itself.

Status
Not open for further replies.

keannu

VIP Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2010
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Korean
Home Country
South Korea
Current Location
South Korea
Source : Korean SAT English by Education Broadcasting System, 95p, 3
Some people think that facts are the same as events, which they regard as the "objective," "hard core" elements of this universe. The main reason for thinking this is that events seem the best candidates to offer us a rock-solid foundation for our facts. True, events do happen or do not happen; you can neglect them but not deny them. So by replacing facts with events, we might think we have found the strong objective foundation that we strive for. However, facts and events are concepts very different from each other. Unlike facts, events are dated, tied to space and time, whereas facts are detached from space and time. It is even considered a fact that certain events did not occur; it is a fact, for instance, that Darwin did not have a copy of Mendel's 1866 article in his collection. Apparently, a fact is not the same as an event; the best we can say is that a fact is a description of an event, but not the event itself.
================================
It's hard to understand this passage. Do you understand the two underlined parts well?
Facts seem to be equal to events, but the writer is saying facts are groundless.
 

5jj

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
Czech Republic
Current Location
Czech Republic
Facts seem to be equal to events, but the writer is saying facts are groundless.
Neither of these is correct.

I was granted Czech citizenship four years ago.
That is a fact. The granting was the event.

I do not speak Chinese.
That is a fact. It is not an event.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top