[Grammar] AAB at A levels

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uktous

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Hi,

Sorry, I know that the grading system between UK and US are different.


Question:
Is the following sentence correct?

Sentence:
The achievement that I want to mention is AAB at A-Levels (UK).



The following link suggests that UK people will say "AAB at A levels":


Entry requirements Typical offer is AAB at A level
BA Management - Coursefinder - University of Leeds

Thanks
 
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emsr2d2

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Hi,

Sorry, I know that the grading system between UK and US are different.


Question:
Is the following sentence correct?

Sentence:
The achievement that I want to mention is AAB at A-Levels (UK).



The following link suggests that UK people will say "AAB at A levels":


Entry requirements Typical offer is AAB at A level
BA Management - Coursefinder - University of Leeds

Thanks

Yes, the grading system makes sense but I would be more inclined simply to say "I gained/obtained AAB at A-Level" or "I passed three A-Levels, with grades of A, A and B". But the simpler "AAB at A-Level" (note the singular "Level") is commonly used. We don't normally refer to exam results as an achievement in BrE, despite the fact that in some cases it's a real achievement to have passed them at all (in my case, for example!)

I think you probably know this, but just in case anyone else is curious, the A-level (A = Advanced) exams are the ones that we take at the age of 18. We used to take O-Levels (O = Ordinary) and CSEs (Certificate of Secondary Education) at 16, but these have been replaced with one single exam type - GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education). However, A-Levels still exist and most people in the UK take either 3 or 4 subjects. Entry into university is based on the results of those exams (and in most cases an interview as well). We always list the results with the best ones first, and rarely bother saying what the subjects were.
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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I agree that something like "I passed three A-Levels, with grades of A, A and B" is better because the person reading it, if unfamiliar with the British system will know that way that this refers to three separate subject. You could also say I got A grades in x & y and a B in z.
 
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