[Grammar] Abbreviated English use in newspaper headlines.

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keitin

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Here are some Abbreviated English(AE) of written English used in the newspaper headlines:

CLINTION IN BULGARIA THIS WEEK
OLD MAN FINDS RARE COIN
BUSH HIRES WIFE AS SECRETARY
POPE DIES IN VATICAN

A. Translate each of these headlines into Standard American English(SAE).

i wrote:

Clinton is in Bulgaria this week.
An old man finds the rare coin.
Bush hires a wife as his secretary.
The Pope died in Vatican.

any mistake?


C. Are there other contexts(besides headlines) in which we find AE?

i cannot figure out the answer.


thank you for your help.
 

TheParser

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Here are some Abbreviated English(AE) of written English used in the newspaper headlines:

CLINTION IN BULGARIA THIS WEEK
OLD MAN FINDS RARE COIN
BUSH HIRES WIFE AS SECRETARY
POPE DIES IN VATICAN

A. Translate each of these headlines into Standard American English(SAE).

i wrote:

Clinton is in Bulgaria this week.
An old man finds the rare coin.
Bush hires a wife as his secretary.
The Pope died in Vatican.

any mistake?


C. Are there other contexts(besides headlines) in which we find AE?

i cannot figure out the answer.


thank you for your help.

***** NOT A TEACHER *****

Good morning, Keitin.

Here are my suggestions:

Secretary of State Clinton Arrives in Bulgaria This Week

An Old Man Finds a Rare Coin (If you use "the," that means that he was purposely looking for a specific coin. But in this case, I think he just accidentally found a coin that people later discovered was rare.)

Former President Bush Hires His Wife as His Secretary. (If you use " a wife," that means that he hired the wife of anyone. I think he probably hired his OWN wife.)


Have a nice day!
 
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BobK

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:up: ...Also The Pope died in the Vatican. 'Vatican' usually has the definite article when it's a noun. When used adjectivally, it can have any article (or none): 'A Vatican official said...';'The Vatican official ...'; 'Vatican officials...'.

b
 

Barb_D

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You may find similarly short styles in a telegram (if they are still used these days) or in a bulleted list.
 

BobK

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You may find similarly short styles in a telegram (if they are still used these days) ...

I last sent one in 1971 (I was in Barcelona and Internet cafes/email were things of the future - although maybe there were pockets of 'proto-email' ;-))

b
 
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