Advanced Reading Comprehension question

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Baguji

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I apologize if this thread isn't located in the proper place but while I was practicing with the Reading Comprehension exercises that were posted online I came up with a doubt regarding one of the questions asked in "Cheating and Plagiarism".

Q7 - If students want to use other students' laboratory data, they must ask them and the lecturer first.

We can answer with "True" / "False" or "Not given". In the text it is said that one particular form of plagiarism is " 'dry-labbing', which includes obtaining and using experimental data from fellow students without the express consent of the lecturer".

So I thought I could infer from that sentence that as long as you have the consent of the lecturer you could use experimental data from fellow students - thus making the answer "True" , but it seems the correct answer to the question is "False".

The only thing I can think of is that nowhere in the text it is said you would also need your colleagues' consent though I'm not entirely sure if that's why the answer is "False".

Could someone please explain?
 

Tdol

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Would you want your colleagues to publish your work under their names with the consent of the lecturer? I guess you might want them to ask you before they steal your work. If you test plagiarism against years of your own work, you should be able to be clear on it. If you do three years' work, who does it belong to in your opinion? And we're not talking sharing or open-source, we're talking about giving stuff away so that others can make money from it, with the permission of someone who did not make it and does not own it.

Think about your own work being given away.

Not by a team member but a professor who contributed nothing.

Happy?
 

Baguji

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Yes I get that but I don't understand why the "without the express consent of the lecturer" is added to the sentence then - that implies that what you said that shouldn't be done could, in fact, be done if the lecturer consented to it.

If your opinion is correct, then that part shouldn't be in the text altogether - it doesn't make sense if it still counts as plagiarism even if the lecturer consents.
 

Raymott

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Yes I get that but I don't understand why the "without the express consent of the lecturer" is added to the sentence then - that implies that what you said that shouldn't be done could, in fact, be done if the lecturer consented to it.

If your opinion is correct, then that part shouldn't be in the text altogether - it doesn't make sense if it still counts as plagiarism even if the lecturer consents.
I agree with you, as least from what you've posted. It's a comprehension test, not a test of your opinion about plagiarism.
If the text says plagiarism is OK in certain circumstances, and a question asks about that, the answer is that plagiarism is OK in certain circumstances - regardless of whether it is in reality.
 
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