Are you moving in?

diamondcutter

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The summer holiday was coming but Zach was a little sad. He would have to move during the holiday. ... Zach told his mom, “I don’t want to move... “You will have a much bigger bedroom, and you will meet new friends at your new school,” promised his mom. Zach wasn’t so sure.
 When Zach and his mom arrived, Dad took Zach to the backyard. There, Zach saw a big tree house. “Wow!” Zach shouted. “This is great!” All of a sudden, Zach heard a boy’s voice. “Are you moving in? My name is Joey and I live next door. Can I have a look at your tree house?”
...
Source: the English test paper, Senior High School Entrance Examinations 2019, Henan province, China

1. The question “Are you moving in?” above means “Are you going to move in?” That is to say, the present progressive tense is used to express the future.

2. In this context, It’s also appropriate for the boy to ask like this:
Has you just moved in?
Or
Are you new here?

Do you agree?
 

Tarheel

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I assume you mean: "When Zach and his mom arrived at the new place."

1. They are moving in. (Not going to.)
2. Maybe he could say, "Are you are new neighbors?" ("Have you just moved in?" is possible.)
 

tedmc

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1. The question “Are you moving in?” above means “Are you going to move in?” That is to say, the present progressive tense is used to express the future.

2. In this context, It’s also appropriate for the boy to ask like this:
Has Have you just moved in?
Or
Are you new here? I think this is not appropriate.
 

5jj

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In this particular context, the progressive form could refer to the action in progress or it could refer to an action in the near future.

If there is a removal van parked outside the door and workers are carrying furniture into the house,, the former situation is more likely.
 

Tarheel

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"Are you new here?" seems perfectly fine to me. In fact, it's perfectly natural. (I myself have said, "Are you my new neighbor?")
 

Tdol

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If there is a removal van parked outside the door and workers are carrying furniture into the house,, the former situation is more likely.
And if they have a contract to show, then the progressive form would also work.
 

Tarheel

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Let's look at it from Joey's perspective. He sees the commotion, and he gets excited because he thinks he's going to have some new neighbors. He sees Zach, and he says, "Are you moving in?" He's not asking a question so much as starting a conversation. (What he can see tells him they're moving in.) Also, to the extent that it is a question he wants them to confirm then and there that that's what they're doing. He's not asking about what they're going to do at some unspecified time in the future.
 

diamondcutter

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Could I make this conclusion?

“Are you moving in?” is a very appropriate question to start a conversation in that context.
 
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