backup lecturer

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flytothesky

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Dec 11, 2008
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Student or Learner
Hello~ Can you help me say this naturally please?

A: Sorry student, your lecturer got sick today so he can't come to the class.
1. I’m your replacement lecturer for today’s lecture.
2. I’m a backup lecturer for today’s lecture.
3. I’m a fill in lecturer for today’s lecture.

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A: What did you learn yesterday in a lecture?
B: Not much, the lecturer got sick so couldn't come.
One backup lecturer gave us lecture but it was kind of boring.
 

TheParser

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Dec 8, 2009
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Hello~ Can you help me say this naturally please?

A: Sorry student, your lecturer got sick today so he can't come to the class.
1. I’m your replacement lecturer for today’s lecture.
2. I’m a backup lecturer for today’s lecture.
3. I’m a fill in lecturer for today’s lecture.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

A: What did you learn yesterday in a lecture?
B: Not much, the lecturer got sick so couldn't come.
One backup lecturer gave us lecture but it was kind of boring.

***** NOT A TEACHER *****

Good morning, Flytothesky.

(1) Hopefully, someone who lives where you are currently living will

answer you with a reliable answer.

(2) Here in the United States, when a high school teacher is absent, we

call his/her replacement a "substitute teacher."

If we want to be super respectful, we call him/her a "guest teacher."

(3) You are at the university. Right? Here in the States, we usually refer

to the "professor." I notice that you use the term "lecturer."

(a) I googled and found many references to "substitute professor"

and "substitute lecturer."

(4) If no one else answers with a reliable answer, you might want to

search the Web -- concentrating on the country in which you live.

As you know, English differs from country to country. I think (not sure!)

that a substitute high school teacher in the United Kingdom is called a

a "supply teacher," a term that would really confuse an American!

Have a nice day!
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
I would say a substitute lecturer. We do use supply teachers, but that would be more for schools, who have contracts with agencies to provide teachers at short notice.
 
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