[General] begin with or begin from?

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cubezero3

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Shipment is to be made in three equal installments, beginning ________ December, 20 ...

My first thought was to put from in the blank. Then it seems like with is a better option, as least according to the answers table.

Can people use begin with to take on time, just like begin from?

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Richard
 

Tdol

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Beginning from- this would be used to indicate the start of a time period, but here you have three separate dates for delivery, not a single time period, so we begin with December 20 -the first delivery date- then...
 

Raymott

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My first thought was to put from in the blank. Then it seems like with is a better option, as least according to the answers table.

Can people use begin with to take on time, just like begin from?

Thanks

Richard
I'd say 'in'. If the first installment ships in December, 2010, that's when shipping of installments begins.
If you mean 20th December, I'd use "on".

Shipment is to be made in three equal installments, beginning with that of December, 20 ... ('that' = the shipment or the installment)
 
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SoothingDave

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Or just leave the blank blank. "Beginning December 20."
 

tedtmc

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Or just leave the blank blank. "Beginning December 20."

I agree. It is common nowadays for the preposition to be dropped.
Just like 'effective from Dec 20' which is written 'effective 20 Dec'.

not a teacher
 
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