Check out

Ju

Key Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
Hong Kong
Current Location
Hong Kong
We finished the shopping and are checking out at the cashier.

Is the above sentence correct?

Thanks.
 
J

J&K Tutoring

Guest
The finishing and the checking out happened at the same time, so best if the verbs agree:

1. We have finished the shopping and are checking out at the cashier.
2. We finished the shopping and checked out at the cashier.
3. We had finished the shopping and were checking out at the cashier.
 

tedmc

VIP Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2014
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
Malaysia
Current Location
Malaysia
You do not need "the" before "shopping".
 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
None of them sounds right to my BE ear. We don't say 'check out at the cashier'.

We say 'pay the cashier' or 'pay at the till' where I live.
 
J

J&K Tutoring

Guest
I see your point, RobertJ. Wedged into a narrow and very specific time frame, the original might certainly be commonly heard. The OP did ask if it was correct. I stand by my opinion that it is not actually correct and would be best if slightly altered.

Ju: My #1 suggestion is closest to the original. In spoken English, we have would be contracted to we've and, when followed by a word that begins with the same mouth configuration (finished), the "v" of we've would get rather lost (would not be voiced), so it would quite likely sound like we finished...
 
Last edited:

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
The OP sounds fine to me as well.

Cross posted with JK.
 

Barb_D

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 12, 2007
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
This is one of the times when the US version of English uses the simple past (or present perfect - both are fine) where our British friends use present perfect.

It's actually not that uncommon when someone knows I'm at the grocery store to get a call. "Hey Mom, are you still at the store?" "Well, yeah, but I finished shopping and I'm line to pay/and the cashier is ringing me up now -- what do you need?"
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
None of them sounds right to my BE ear. We don't say 'check out at the cashier'.

We say 'pay the cashier' or 'pay at the till' where I live.

But another BrE term for the cashiers/till is check-out. I use it as a noun, but not as a verb in the supermarket context.
 

Ju

Key Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
Hong Kong
Current Location
Hong Kong
But another BrE term for the cashiers/till is check-out. I use it as a noun, but not as a verb in the supermarket context.

You meant:

I clear the bill at the check-out in the supermarket.

Thanks.
 

GoesStation

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I clear the bill at the check-out in the supermarket.
You don't "clear the bill". In a place where a bill exists, you pay it. That doesn't happen at a supermarket though. It happens at a bar or a restaurant, or any place where you could be presented with a statement of expenses you have to settle.

You could say I pay the cashier at the check-out at the supermarket.
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
In the case of a bar or a restaurant, you could say "pick up the tab/check".
 

Barb_D

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 12, 2007
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
In the case of a bar or a restaurant, you could say "pick up the tab/check".

In my use, "picking up" the tab means you pay for other people. You are "treating them."

If it's just you/your family, you would not use "pick up."
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
That's right. I use it if I pay for other people.
 
Top