Constructing sentences using the word dance

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Odessa Dawn

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'I dance greatly' is wrong.
'I dance great' is informally acceptable.
'I'm a great dancer' is fine.

[SUP]
:up: Or 'My dancing is great'.

('His dancing is greatly over-rated! - you can use the -ly adverb there. :))

b

"6[/SUP] But at a birthday party for Herod, Herodias's daughter performed a dance that greatly pleased him,

[SUP]7[/SUP] so he promised with a vow to give her anything she wanted."


Please check the following sentences in which I am looking forward to constructing statements that are syntactically and semantically acceptable to native English speakers. I have checked the above sources in order to learn how native speakers build a correct sentence of the word dance and I just to follow suit.

[SUP]1.I can perform a dance that greatly pleases others.[/SUP]

[SUP]2.Performing a dance in such a way can bring you to wealth and prestige. [/SUP]

[SUP]3.Your dancing is beyond measure.[/SUP]

[SUP]4.Her shape means she can dance greatly.[/SUP]

[SUP]5.She is looking forward to performing a dance in which her situation will improve (earning a lot of money). In other words, putting an end to her misery.[/SUP]

[SUP]6.She is her family's bread winner and from the lower class. Thus, dancing greatly will set her free from being in debt to debt-free. [/SUP]

 

5jj

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#1 and #2 are possible, though unlikely ever be uttered by native speakers, in my opinion. #3 and #4 are unnatural. 5 is just about possible, though very unlikely to be uttered. #6 is not possible,
 

BobK

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I don't know what you hope to achieve, but...
...
[SUP]1.I can perform a dance that greatly pleases others.[/SUP]OK but unlikely in the 21st century

[SUP]2.Performing a dance in such a way can bring you [STRIKE]to[/STRIKE] wealth and prestige. [/SUP]OK but unlikely in the 21st century - even less so with the 'to'.

[SUP]3.Your dancing is beyond measure.[/SUP]Grammatically fine, but meaningless. The thing to measure is verve/energeticness/skill.... You can't measure dancing.

[SUP]4.Her shape means she can dance greatly.[/SUP]:cross: (And I don't care if an infinite number of monkeys produced that text by randomly typing ;-))

[SUP]5.She is looking forward to performing a dance in which her situation will improve:tick: (earning a lot of money). In other words, putting an end to her misery.[/SUP] After the tick, there is a dangling participle and then a 'sentence' that lacks a finite verb.)

[SUP]6.She is her family's bread winner and from the lower class. Thus, dancing greatly will set her free from being in debt [STRIKE]to debt-free[/STRIKE]. [/SUP] See above. Dancing and greatly don't collocate. They can, by an accident of syntax, occur next to each other - as in 'Her dancing greatly pleased him'.
b
 
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